Archive for June, 2014

Simmaron Research Foundation Study Targeting Roots of Immune System Breakdown in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

June 13, 2014

Simmaron Research’s  new immune study builds on exciting research that is changing how we think about ME/CFS.

Twenty years ago  the internationally known virus hunter, Dr. Ian Lipkin of Columbia University, didn’t find Borna Virus in people with ME/CFS, but he never forgot the immune dysfunction he found.  Twenty years later he found more immune dysfunction in another study.

Isabel Barao, PhD, Simmaron Research Scientific Director

Isabel Barao, PhD, the Simmaron Research Foundations Scientific Director believes a genetic predisposition to immune problems could underlie ME/CFS

He doesn’t know why it’s there but he does believe that all ME/CFS cases – no matter what pathogen or other factor has triggered them –  devolve to a ‘common pathway’. The fact that pathogens of all types – from Epstein-Barr Virus, to SARS, to Giardia – can trigger ME/CFS suggests a core immune deficiency lies at the heart of the illness.

Every genetic study suggests an inherited susceptibility to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is present. Dr. Mady Hornig of the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University believes that a genetic predisposition in combination with an environmental trigger (such as an infection) occurring at just the right (wrong) time is probably key to coming down with ME/CFS.

For thirty or forty years you might be able to easily slough off this bug or that pathogen, but at some point for some reason the stars aligned; you were depleted in just the right way, the pathogen hit and with your immune system genetically predisposed to crack under the pressure – it did – and your entire system faltered.

gene strand

Simmaron is looking for the genetic roots of an immune system breakdown

Simmaron Research’s next pilot study is looking for that immune crack in the dike – the genetic underpinnings of the system collapse that occurred. Led by Simmaron’s Scientific Director, Isabel Barao, PhD, in collaboration with researchers at the National Cancer Institute and University of Nevada Reno, it will determine if your NK and B-cells and macrophages are genetically predisposed to respond poorly to a virus, toxin, or cancer cell.

Dr. Barao is studying whether people with ME/CFS have polymorphisms – unusual gene formations – that make their key immune cells less likely to respond well to viruses and other threats. That immune ‘hole’ many people have talked about with regards to ME/CFS could start here. We all know about the rampant NK cell problems in ME/CFS, but this study could help explain the B-cell problems recently uncovered in a German research study – and perhaps even shed light on why Rituximab may be working in some patients.

It’s the initial part of a projected three-part study that could end with drugs for ME/CFS. Once genetic alterations have been found, they’ll be correlated with immune findings. If that holds up, it’ll  be time to look for drugs to fix the problem, two of which are currently in clinical trials.

We-Have-Ideas

Support the Simmaron Research Foundation as it redefines how ME/CFS is understood and treated

Think about it. The high heritability rates in ME/CFS indicate genetic problems exist somewhere. Where better to look than the immune system?

This study is a no-brainer to me. It’s relatively cheap – it has a quick six-month turnaround – and the data it produces will lay the foundation for an NIH grant on topics they’ve  shown they’re willing to fund.

Help us redefine ME/CFS.  Support breakthrough science on immune deficiencies at Simmaron.

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Brief Report From Dr. Prigden on the Fibromyalgia Antiviral Trial – and the Future Chronic Fatigue Syndrome One

It’s not too much to say that if successful, the Pridgen antiviral trials for Fibromyalgia would be a paradigm changer – turning FM from a poorly treated central nervous system disorder to a  disorder characterized by a (hopefully) treatable herpesvirus infection.

Is it a breakthrough? The results look good so far - stay tuned!

Is it a breakthrough? The results look good so far – stay tuned!

Pridgen’s approach is new in several ways. Not only has no one targeted herpesviruses in FM before, but the  herpesvirus Pridgen is targeting, herpes simplex virus, is one no one has connected with either FM or ME/CFS before.

Pridgen has also combined an antiviral with an anti-inflammatory (with antiviral properties).  Rumors have abounded regarding the identity or identities of the drugs, but we won’t know officially which they are until the report is made.

The fact that we haven’t had a press release by now regarding the Phase II trial has lead to some concern. (Phase two trials are typically larger trials (1-several hundred people) that further assess a treatment’s efficacy and safety. Pridgen’s Phase II trial was a large multi-center trial.)

I contacted Dr. Pridgen to see what he could say at this point. This is what he said.

  • They hope to present their research mid-Nov
  • A press release will predate that
  • The treatment was statistically significantly effective in improving nearly every primary and secondary endpoint
  • The treatment was significantly superior to placebo (p<.oo1) (not sure which  endpoints)
  • The treatment was better tolerated than placebo
  • The results in the FM trial are good enough that preliminary plans are being made for toxicology studies that will allow them to move forward on a similar Proof of Concept Phase 2 CFS (ME/CFS) trial; i.e. they’re beginning to work on a similar ME/CFS trial.
  • They will be looking for government/humanitarian funding for that.

The Earlier Video

Check out a confident Dr. Pridgen as he talks about the Fibromyalgia trial sometime around April at a local news station.

 

Conclusion

It’s going to take longer for the final results than many had hoped but the news otherwise is good.  The significant improvement in almost all the endpoints is promising (and I would say somewhat unusual).  The fact that they’re beginning preliminary planning for an ME/CFS trial suggests that the FM trial went well indeed.

Still, we won’t know how significant the significant improvements are until the press and study release probably in November.

That will be frustrating to those who want to get going on treatments now, but my understanding is that this period – prior to publication – is a delicate period in the development of any drug. If that’s true think how much more so it is for a startup company that’s going to need to raise significant funds for the  big Phase III trial.  Publicly releasing the full results and the drug combo they’ve identified this far in advance of publication would be a mistake.

For more on Pridgen’s antiviral trial check out