You are here: Simmaron ResearchPathogensThe Pridgen Revolution? Dr. Pridgen on Bringing His Antiviral Approach to Fibromyalgia To Market

The Pridgen Revolution? Dr. Pridgen on Bringing His Antiviral Approach to Fibromyalgia To Market

The Pridgen Revolution?

Almost three years ago, Dr. Pridgen threatened to turn the world of fibromyalgia treatment on its head. Few had connected fibromyalgia with viruses or even immune problems when Pridgen announced that a) FM is caused herpes simplex virus reactivation and b) that it could be treated with antivirals. Then he shocked a chronic fatigue syndrome community (ME/CFS) well acquainted with antivirals with his assertion that one antiviral drug was not enough.  (Pridgen believes the same process is going on in ME/CFS). Pridgen wasn’t done, though, instead of using the usual anti-herpes virus drugs he used an anti-inflammatory (Celebrex) that had antiviral properties as his second antiviral.

pridgen_skipPridgen was knocking down received wisdom at every turn. One would not have been remiss to think that he and his unusual protocol would, as other supposed cures have, disappear at some point, but he hasn’t.

Instead, touting his success with the drug combo, Pridgen embarked on the long and difficult task of bringing a new treatment to market. After joining up with a University of Alabama virologist, Dr. Carol Duffy, Pridgen formed a biotech company aptly named Innovative Med Concepts, hired an ex-Pfizer vice-president, put together a strong scientific board, raised the money for a Phase 2 trial, and embarked on toxicology testing.

The Phase II trial was successful enough for the drug combo to move forward. Then Innovate Med Concept got a break when FDA granted fast-track status to its IMC-1 formulation, allowing the drug combo to move forward as quickly as possible.  (Fast-track status is granted to serious diseases that have “substantial impact on day-to-day functioning.”)

Now comes the real work – raising money for some very, very expensive Phase 3 trials. It’s been about a year since we checked in. In an interview, I asked Pridgen how it was going.

The Pridgen Interview

The Phase II trial results were certainly quite good, but they weren’t spectacular.  How did the Phase II trial inform the Phase III trial and how will it be different?

We wanted to prove the concept first with a dose that we knew would be effective.  Additionally, we chose this lower dose, as it would allow us to begin without first performing the very expensive and time-consuming toxicology studies. We will be beginning the final 2 toxicology studies necessary to be Phase 3 ready, this month, and we expect to have these completed late this winter or in early spring 2017.

This was a year to prep for the big Phase III trials. How much money do you need to raise? Do you need to do one or two trials and how big does the trial or trials need to be? How much money do you need to raise?

Typically, two Phase 3 studies are required, the studies require 500-1000 patients per study, and these studies cost $25-50 million each.

One report suggested that some pharmaceutical companies have shown interest. Can you say anything about that?

drug-developmentWe have met with a dozen different pharmaceutical companies. All knew that we would be either forming a strategic partnership, or continuing the drug development ourselves once we near Phase 3 readiness. We will meet with these pharmaceutical companies to discuss a possible partnership at the upcoming JP Morgan meeting Jan 2017 in San Francisco.

We’ve seen a couple of high-profile Phase III trial failures recently. One may have been due to doctors misidentifying a side effect as something else and using a drug that interfered with the results. Another got excellent results in the Phase II trial but then didn’t meet its primary endpoint (but did meet some of its secondary endpoints) in the Phase III trial.  In another trial a very high placebo rate surfaced. What can you do to ensure that IMC-1 trial goes as well as possible?

We have actually been using a variant of this combination at my office for 2-3 years, so we are extremely confident in, not only its efficacy, but also know the combination is quite well tolerated and safe. Though providing the necessary optimal dose is incredibly time-consuming for the office staff, and complicated for the patients, we endure this hardship because of the dramatic improvement they experience.

Dr. Pridgen remains very, (very) confident in the effects of his protocol; he’s so confident that he anticipates raising the bar for the primary endpoint of his Phase 3 trials. Drugs have failed because they chose the wrong primary endpoint or too difficult of a primary endpoint, but Pridgen reports the study will use the most difficult primary endpoint to attain of any fibromyalgia trial to date:

Finally, because IMC-1 is so effective, we will use a primary endpoint that represents the highest bar ever used for any of the drugs previously studied for FM. We feel that this will negate to some degree the placebo effect.

We can see from studies and patient comments that the fibromyalgia population is pretty heterogeneous one. Some people do well on Lyrica – others do terribly. Low dose naltrexone works very well for some and others do poorly on it, etc., etc. The heterogeneity seen in the reactions to pain medications, in general, is pretty daunting. Is there any way you can target FM patients who are more likely to do well on the drug?

Again, Pridgen waxed confident in how efficacious this drug combination is. He believes his is the only protocol that gets at the source of fibromyalgia.

We believe IMC-1 is targeting the possible cause of fibromyalgia, not just modifying the body’s perception of pain.

Emedicine lists four antivirals (Famvir, Valtrex, Acyclovir, Penciclovir) used to treat herpes simplex infections. You’ve found that you need to add Celebrex to Famvir to get the best results in FM. Why do you think this is?

Penciclovir is not available in the PO form because it is not well absorbed, so it is a better topical agent.  Actually, Famvir turns into the active form, penciclovir, once it is acted on by human and viral enzymes. Celebrex is effective as an antiviral also. Herpes viruses are known to up-regulate the Cox-1 and Cox-2 enzymes to maximize viral activation. Though Celebrex (celecoxib) is known as a Cox-2 inhibitor, it actually has substantial Cox-1 inhibition.

viral-attack-cfsAre the herpes simplex infections harder in FM harder to get at than in other diseases? Do you need to reach into the central nervous system?

Essentially all adults have HSV-1, but we believe there is an immune defect in place in some patients, which results in an inability to force the virus into dormancy after an acute infection. In other words, patients with FM, have an ongoing HSV-1 infection, which we feel results in a chronic stress response. The meds can act centrally, however, the virus lives in the Trigeminal, and Nodose ganglia which are intracranial, but technically not in the CNS. The dorsal sacral root ganglia are the third major site (in the pelvis) where the virus resides.

Note: The herpes virus is known to hide out all three of these ganglia or cell bodies.

  • Trigeminal ganglia – is the largest and most complex of the 12 cranial nerves. The trigeminal ganglia provides sensations to the face and other parts of the head. It also sends signals that allow us to chew and even helps with balance. People with trigeminal neuralgia can experience high levels of pain when doing things like brushing their teeth or putting on makeup.
  • Nodose ganglia – are sensory ganglia or nerve cell bodies of the vagus nerve that are found near the top of the spine..
  • Dorsal sacral root ganglia – are associated with vertebrae in the pelvic area. The nerves emanating from them impact all areas of gut and pelvic functioning. In between bouts of genital herpes virus reactivation, the herpes simplex virus hides in these ganglia.

Like the other herpesviruses, almost everyone is infected with HSV-1, and when reactivated these infections can be pretty harmful. They’ve been shown to cause gastrointestinal and esophageal disorders, acute viral encephalitis, and approximately 25% of all genital herpes infections. Fibromyalgia is a bit different; it causes widespread pain, fatigue, sleep and sometimes mood problems as well as other symptoms- and is thought more of as a central nervous system disorder than anything else. Can you explain what the herpes simplex virus is doing differently in FM to cause this extraordinary range of symptoms?

The ongoing stress response affects nearly every system in the body. The immune response to this stress response over time affects sleep, mood, anxiety, thyroid, adrenal function, GI tract, HA’s and much more.

Dr. Duffy was reportedly writing up a paper on her gut findings. Can you tell us that the status of that is?

We have one last sample (of 60 total) to obtain to complete the study.

(At a conference Duffy was reported to find HSV-1 in 100% of FM gut biopsies and a protein found only in cells that are actively infected with HSV-1 in 80% of patients.)

With another year under your belt have you learned anything new treating FM using Famvir and Celebrex?

We have found that anything that was previously part of the functional somatic syndrome will improve on this treatment. At the risk of sounding like a snake oil salesman, we have patients who have chronic non-seasonal sinusitis, HA’s, brain fog, and even libido issues who swear by IMC-1.

Dosing – I also asked Dr. Pridgen about dosing information. He replied that the dosing information has to be proprietary right now. This is because pharmaceutical companies or other funding sources would not back a product composed of already approved drugs if the dosages were put in the public realm. Given the enormous costs of the Phase 3 trials, Pridgen’s drug combo would never make it to market without their backing.

That means FM patients will have to wait before Dr. Pridgen publicly reports on the appropriate dose. For many people this conversation is moot – their doctors would not prescribe antivirals now anyway. People seeing Dr. Pridgen or people seeing doctors in touch with Dr. Pridgen will obviously get the right doses.

If the trials are successful and the FDA approves the IMC-1 formulation everyone should be able to get a shot at these drugs.

Can you give us a timeline regarding the Phase III trial(s)?

They will start next year.

____________________________

For more on Dr. Pridgen’s antiviral approach to fibromyalgia:

Print Friendly

57 Comments

  • Andrew

    October 18, 2016 at 1:25 am - Reply

    Given both drugs are currently already available, this would have to be mostly an exercise in creating new business ? I’ve given the combo a trial a couple of times. I’m not sure if I beleive the whole Herpes approach, even though it sounds feasible, but I think it might just work because they are both powerful pain killers ? My dynamic energy levels seemed to increase on the medication as well as my recovery times, but I think my stamina went down a little bit. Also there was some sort of neuroinhibition going on as well as I couldnt think as laterally as before. I find any sort of blunting of the mind seems to help with CFS. If you look at every medication that gets used to treat CFS they are all just numbing the brain in some way. As Dr. Cheney always said, treating CFS is about putting the dysfunctional brain on ice until something better comes along.

    • Cort Johnson

      October 18, 2016 at 9:54 pm - Reply

      Consider that if this treatment works it will never become readily available for the vast majority of FM patients unless it gets FDA approval. That’s true for any drug but it’s more true for this combo. How many rheumatologists or general practitioners, after all, think FM is caused by a virus? (1%?) On the other hand, if it passes muster at the FDA, however, every rheumatologist in the country will know about it and most FM patients will have a shot at it.

      Plus, Dr. Pridgen didn’t talk about the dosage but it’s my understanding that the dosage does not fit the standard formulations available.

      I have no idea about the pain-killing ability of herpesvirus drugs but if herpes viruses are turning the immune system on then knocking them down would reduce immune activation and likely result in pain reductions as well (since the immune system is probably involved in producing pain. )

    • Mrs. Moore

      October 22, 2016 at 3:45 am - Reply

      I was taking the regime Dr. Pridgen prescribed after a couple months I had 5 weeks without a bad flare-up. This was my first 5 weeks since I was diagnosed a year & 1/2 ago. The Rhuematologist wanted me to come off the meds. Two weeks later I had to go back on the meds because I started back having bad flare-ups daily. Dr. Pridgen helped me to have more good days. This is progress, expecially when you ache everyday. I Love Dr. Pridgen!!!
      Thanks,
      Dr. Pridgen

  • Deb

    October 18, 2016 at 2:16 am - Reply

    I started taking valcyclovir for shingles outbreaks a number of years ago. When I recovered last year from Lyrica withdrawal, I started taking the valcyclovir everyday along with vitamin d3 and other multivitamin supplements for my age group. This year in early spring I started feeling really good for the first time in ten years. It was more than just flare free. I felt good. I’m convinced it has something to do the anti viral and the vitamin d3. My osteoarthritis is starting up this fall but other fibro symptoms are minimal. I’m convinced Dr Pridgen is on the right track.

  • Philip Hayward

    October 18, 2016 at 3:12 am - Reply

    There is just a chance, I feel, that HSV flare-ups are one of many things that affect people with FM, but HSV still might not be “the cause” of everything else. The flare-ups in people with FM may be because they have FM (amd whjatever caused it), leading to the reduced immune system capability of keeping it suppressed and latent.

    Treating the HSV would probably cause an improvement regardless – but I would be interested to see whether the trials result in FM patients regarding themselves as “completely cured”.

    My own benchmark for “completely cured”, would be that my aerobic AND anaerobic exercise, and post-exercise recovery capabilities, including of muscle pain, were restored to a level comparable to one of my contemporaries who has not had FM and has stayed fit. I continue to progress towards this goal, following my multi-disciplinary protocol. I would be slightly disappointed if it turned out that anti-viral treatment would have cured me without all the other effort and expense.

    If latent HSV is part of my problem, I would say it has been retreating to latent status in the face of my overall improvement in condition. My immune system gaining capability, perhaps?

    I do think of all the treatments that work to some extent, as like extra pairs of hands on extra spokes of a capstan; several of them in combination, seem to bring about significant improvement for different people, even if the treatments combined, are different ones. Someone swears by guaifenesin, diet, and having a low-stress, enjoyable means of income. Someone else swears by paced exercise, myofascial release therapy, and yoga. Both improve. I would argue that using all six treatments would cause even faster improvement in both people. But only using one or two treatments, does not seem to be sufficient to cause progress towards “being cured”, although they may result in one suffering less pain than otherwise. Antivirals might well be another “help”.

    The folk who spiral down towards total debilitation simply aren’t making use of enough “helps” in combination. I spent two decades “trying things” one at a time. I think changing my career and using guaifenesin, for many years, made my existence more tolerable. But getting the pacing of exercise right, was the biggest boost overall. Also, there are plain wrong treatments that make you worse – muscle strengthening program was definitely a cause of worsening of my FM; and years of trying “exercise” (on and off) but doing it at too high an intensity for my threshold, was of mixed “benefit”. On the one hand it does keep the threshold up; but it is a source of post-exercise muscle tightening, stiffening, trigger point formation, and pain.

    • Cort Johnson

      October 18, 2016 at 10:05 pm - Reply

      Thanks, Phil

      You’re right that the protocol does not completely address the cause…Pridgen has stated that he believes that an immune defect is allowing the herpes virus to reactivate and that antiviral is necessary to keep the herpesviruses down.

      I would be slightly disappointed if it turned out that anti-viral treatment would have cured me without all the other effort and expense.

      That made me laugh. I would say congratulations on your progress and sometimes you take the longer road and sometimes you take the shorter road. At least you’re on the road :)

  • Deb

    October 18, 2016 at 3:35 am - Reply

    I have been a patient of Dr. Pridgen’s and on the IMC-1 regimen for 11 months. I have been prescribed lyrica, cymbalta, savella, LDN and a host of other treatments over the last 25 years with no success in treating fibromyalgia. While it has not been a quick fix, Dr. Pridgen’s IMC-1 has given me my life back and has successfully treated pain, fatigue and sleep issues at a nearly 100% level. The dosages of famvir and celebrex (as well as the other drugs that are part of this protocol) were adjusted several times in the last year to find the best levels for me. I have long suspected that there was an infective cause for fibro because I often felt like I was coming down with the flu, especially during flares. Dr. Pridgen is a doctor who listened to what his patients were telling him and took the incredible steps to prove them right. I believe that this protocol will be proven to be the piece that solves the fibromyalgia puzzle.

    • Cort Johnson

      October 18, 2016 at 10:00 pm - Reply

      Congratulations and thanks for sharing Deb. I’m not surprised that dosage adjustment is needed – which is why it’s best to see an experienced doctor.

      I hope that you’re right! I can’t think of a bigger shock to medical field than Pridgen will deliver to fibromyalgia if the protocol wins out. :)

    • Josh

      October 21, 2016 at 8:04 pm - Reply

      Deb,

      May I ask what your experience was with the protocol. How long did it take before you started feeling better? How long, would you say, was it until you started to return to ‘normal’ (100%)?

      • Deb

        October 21, 2016 at 8:51 pm - Reply

        My biggest issue was that I was having problems with cymbalta that weren’t completely clear until I was totally off of it. If I had to guess, I would guess it was 4 months or so before I started seeing results. At almost 12 months, I would say I am nearly 100% better (I still have occasional nights where getting or staying asleep are an issue.). Pain level is almost always 0, and when it is kicked up, tramadol now works (it did not before being on Pridgen’s regimen). Fatigue is 95% better, and getting better still because of an increased focus on getting re-conditioned by yoga and a core strengthening program. I cannot emphasize strongly enough that the drugs need to be adjusted to fit the particular circumstances/symptoms of the patient! Dr. Pridgen does accept new patients, if you are able to travel. For me, it gave me my life back, so the travel was worth it.

  • Lynn-Z

    October 18, 2016 at 11:10 am - Reply

    Given both drugs are currently already available, this would have to be mostly an exercise in creating new business ?

    Andrew, I would agree with you observation.

    • Cort Johnson

      October 18, 2016 at 9:58 pm - Reply

      Please see my answer to Andrew….The gist is that unless this drug combo gets FDA approval it will never – even if it works great – become available for most people with FM. It has to get approval for most FM patients to have the opportunity to try it.

  • Josh

    October 19, 2016 at 4:52 am - Reply

    I asked this a while ago & wonder if you’ve learned anything, Cort. Do Pridgen or Duffy think that HSV-1 igg tests might not be sensitive to these gut infections? That is, do people who show up positive on the gut biopsies but negative for the igg test?

    • Cort Johnson

      October 19, 2016 at 8:05 pm - Reply

      That/s a great question. I forgot to ask and will try and find out.

    • Cort Johnson

      October 19, 2016 at 8:24 pm - Reply

      Dr. Pridgen reported “We have found while 75-80 percent of the patients are IgG seropositive. 100% of GI biopsies are HSV-1 DNA positive.”

  • David

    October 20, 2016 at 3:10 am - Reply

    Over the years i have followed Dr Pridgeon and many other ME/CFS and Fibromyalgia researchers and doctors and specialist.I am so happy and amaised at the Knowledge and Wisdom that Dr Pridgeon posesses.I feel that he is so right about this disease and that its caused by the hearpes virus and that this coctail of medications will actually get to the root cause of Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS..I look forward to this treatment after suffering allmost 9 years now.Thank you Cort.

  • Clariza

    October 20, 2016 at 11:49 pm - Reply

    Thank you Dr. Pridgen. I have taken Cymbalta and Savella with no success. I have also tried Tramadol, Methocarbamol, Celebrex, Zoloft, Buprioprion, Ambien, Gapabentin, and Topamax. My Dr. was kind enough to be willing to try LDN, as proposed by the Stanford Medical Center and Dr. Montoya. I would love it if all us FM/ME patients had easier access to these innovative treatments. I have been suffering with both FM and ME/CFS for over 4 years. I did get an epidural at a nerve-pinch site on my spine and with the LDN, the pain has gotten manageable. I hope that Dr. Pridgen is on the right track.

  • Ken

    October 21, 2016 at 12:54 pm - Reply

    I was able to get my PCP to prescribe Celebrex and Famvir for me in the spring of 2015 (though I can’t recall the dosage). I felt better and as if I was on the mend for about 4-5 weeks, then I relapsed back into my normal CFS state. I discontinued after a total of 3 months. I just wonder if different dosage would’ve carried me on to complete remission. Can’t wait to see how this turns out.

    • Cort Johnson

      October 21, 2016 at 5:03 pm - Reply

      I wonder if you had a doctor more familiar with the protocol they would have been able to adjust it better. Dr. Pridgen does see patients but he’s in Alabama. I believe he will also consult with your doctor.

  • Laura

    October 21, 2016 at 10:48 pm - Reply

    Hi, I first had migraines, then fibro symptoms and many years later got genital herpes, so I think I might see if my doc can switch me from acyclovir to Famvir and Nabumetone to Celebrex. I believe all three sites are probably affected (tmj/neck, ears/balance (thinned inner ear bone), head forward/neck pain, low back, pelvic floor, and especially tailbone pain/tension. I am also on Lyrica, cymbalta and wellbutrin for fibro/depression so will want to make sure those work well with Famvir and Celebrex. OTC allergy med (cetiriizine) and guaifenesin daily. Would like to get off some of these if your combo works! I too will probably need to figure out dose, etc. Thank you, LLL

  • judy

    October 22, 2016 at 12:19 am - Reply

    I am a fibro patient and have been for over 20 yrs. I have my family doctor who treats me as best he knows how. I have been on narcotic pain meds and muscle relaxers all these years. I also take neurontin and savella. I have other underlying problems also. I cannot find a doctor around me who will try to help me. They all say that i am on alot of meds. But they dont do anything. they say my doctor is doing all that can be done. I live in east tennessee and there are not alot of good doctors for special things around. I hurt all day everyday. I try to go on with life as best i can. But its hard when you just want to cry or scream most of the time. I really do wish i knew what to do to get to doctors that you are talking about on here. I really need help. Fibro took my life when i was 35. I am 59 now. And not in much better shape than then. I am thankful that all of you have found such help. Please say a prayer for me.

    • Cort Johnson

      October 22, 2016 at 5:16 pm - Reply

      When you can’t get medical help (or even when you can) one place to turn is to Toni Bernhard’s “How to Be Sick” – an excellent book on how to relieve stress when ill. Since we know that the stress causes distress and pain in FM, that book might be particularly apt for FM patients.

    • WM Pridgen MD

      October 23, 2016 at 1:29 am - Reply

      Why don’t you just come and see me. You are not that far away. Or get your Doc to reach out to me on your behalf.

      • judy

        October 23, 2016 at 7:21 pm - Reply

        Dr Pridgen. How do i go about having my DR reach out to you? i have nothing to show him. And as for coming to see you. We are on fixed income. Both have been disabled and dont have very much money left… And i also need to let you know that i live with a bipolar husband. We have been together 48 years. I have done my best to help him and stay with him. But the stress level has been tremendous. Now that he is older it has been some better. But when he does have episodes it is very trying. I am lost on what to do. Doctors have told me to leave. But i love my husband and i cant imagine being without him. So now if you have any suggestions?? Thank you

        • WM Pridgen MD

          October 25, 2016 at 1:05 am - Reply

          He and you can go to Innovativemedconcepts.com
          watch the 2 videos featured on the main page. Also go to tuscaloosasurgery.com and watch the video on the main page. Your Dr can reach out to me on tsasurgery@gmail.com
          Good look

  • Aidan

    October 23, 2016 at 12:22 pm - Reply

    I do not see any Major results from this Research I think he is on the wrong track as any Cause otherwise we would here countless people who got well but we are not…Another wasted theory waste of time…

    • Cort Johnson

      October 23, 2016 at 7:06 pm - Reply

      I think we’re hearing some good progress from some people. Let’s see what the Phase III studies say.

    • Deb

      October 23, 2016 at 7:49 pm - Reply

      Aidan, the way that research works is sometimes very frustrating. There are very specific ways that the FDA requires researchers to test their new meds. This takes years to proceed through phase I, II, and III studies and an enormous, mind-boggling amount of money. All drugs tested don’t pass through to the end of the trials, which means that a great deal of effort and money are wasted. Dr. Pridgen’s protocol, as I understand it, is nearly ready to begin phase III trials. The drug is formulated and further studies to evaluate safety are underway. All of that being said, it will still be years before this specific drug regimen is ready for market, assuming it passes through the phase III trials successfully. “Major results” from his research are also months/years away and can’t be published until the phase III trials are complete and evaluated. Saying that he is on the wrong track is uninformed and ignores the patient results that Dr. Pridgen has seen in patients he treated in his own practice (I am one). He continues to accept new patients who are willing to follow his protocol, knowing that many of us have been sick for decades and have tried many different things to get well. He also willingly offers to speak with a patient’s physician who reaches out on the patient’s behalf without even seeing the patient. I understand the frustration of possibly yet another drug that is widely promised to “fix” fibromyalgia, but until Dr. Pridgen’s phase III trials are complete and published, I will continue to rest on my own experience with his protocol—which has done nothing short of giving me my life back after 25 years of pain, fatigue and lack of sleep.

      • Aidan

        October 24, 2016 at 3:05 pm - Reply

        I still do not believe in his theory plus the positive results were very small so I am not holding my breath on any Viral theory as any Cause especially HSV1 mentioned…Now NIAID just came out with a potential Cause a Genetic mutation duplication Tryptase & that would not point to antivirals…Nice theory but I doubt it will be any Cause HSV1

        • WM Pridgen MD

          October 25, 2016 at 1:12 am - Reply

          You aren’t the only skeptic. It is a unfortunate that you have such a dogmatic opinion. For the record, the phase 2 results were still better than Lyrica, Cymbalta, and Savella and that wasn’t even close to the dose we are going to use in the Phase 2 trial.Be a patient in the upcoming phase 3 and find out.

          • Karel

            April 20, 2017 at 12:04 am -

            Please Dr Pridgen, include me in any trials.. viral has been my thought too.. thanks, karelg438@gmail.com

        • Betty Mekdeci

          March 6, 2017 at 7:53 pm - Reply

          Aidan, I am on a version of the Pridgen protocol and am doing better in many aspects. .I was first diagnosed in 1984 and have been treated by several doctors with a number of different methods.Until 2016, I was a patient of Dr. Paul Cheney before he medically retired. Many of his treatments helped, but not to the extent of this one. Dr. Daniel Dantini in Palm Springs, Florida cured himself of CFS with antivirals. He wrote a book about this that is available on Amazon. I doubt that everyone in the CFS basket has the same illness, so it is natural that treatments work for some and not for others.

  • judy

    October 23, 2016 at 7:23 pm - Reply

    I also want to thank you for your research. This makes alot of sence to me.

  • judy

    October 23, 2016 at 8:13 pm - Reply

    How do you go about getting in on the study. I would like to bein a study. i am ready to try almost anything.
    Email, jbmaxter@gmail.com

    • WM Pridgen MD

      October 25, 2016 at 1:13 am - Reply

      Cort Johnson will of course let you know.

      • Karel

        April 19, 2017 at 11:56 pm - Reply

        Please Dr. Pridgen, include me with any trials.. viral has been my thought.. 17 years fibromyalgia.. karelg438@gmail.com

  • Donna Hayden

    October 26, 2016 at 2:28 pm - Reply

    I would like to thank Dr. Pridgen for his expertise within the field of fibromyalgia. Before being referred to Dr. Pridgen
    I was unable to sleep, use my hands normally or even able to walk without severe pain. I was at the point of not being able
    to work at all. I have been seeing Dr. Pridgen for approximately 5 years and without the medications he has prescribed
    my life would have been almost unbearable.

  • Fiona

    October 28, 2016 at 1:46 am - Reply

    I read about Dr Pridgen’s proposed protocol with interest. I have ME, not fibro, along with severe back pain. Years ago a specialist recommended Celebrex for the back pain, but I couldn’t take it because I’m allergic to sulfa drugs. Bummer!

  • DeborahRNBSN

    November 1, 2016 at 2:50 am - Reply

    I traveled to an office visit with
    Dr. Pridgen a month ago. It was a
    very positive experience. He tailor
    made a plan for me based on an
    assessment of my fibro symptoms
    with the latest treatments. I not
    only got on the antiviral/celebrex
    protocol, however I came out of
    there with some new ideas and
    meds that will make the journey
    on the Pridgen Protocol much more
    comfortable. The fact Dr. Pridgen’s
    plan is tailor made , the fact that I
    did not want to loose anything in
    communication, as well as the fact
    that I wanted to be steadfast- 6 mos
    on the antiviral/celebrex protocol,
    were all reasons that I made the trip
    there to see him in person and go
    to his office in Tuscaloosa for all
    the follow-up visits. The office visit
    with Dr. Pridgen proved beneficial
    and has caused me to have hope
    again in my 15 year struggle with
    severe fibromyalgia. Be sure to
    watch the 3 videos in Dr. Pridgen’s
    post above. They were helpful in
    making my decision to make the
    trip.

    • Cort Johnson

      November 26, 2016 at 7:04 pm - Reply

      Thanks for sharing that :)

    • Lynn-Z

      February 14, 2017 at 8:25 pm - Reply

      Debra, I will be looking forward to hearing about your progress in 6 months and wish you the best.

      One question I have is whether or not Dr. Pridgen accepts insurance or Medicare? This (combined with higher fees) has been and still is a factor for so many of us being able to get different opinions or to stay with a program long term. Thank you.

  • Susan

    November 4, 2016 at 6:53 pm - Reply

    I saw Dr. Pridgen this week and started his protocol. I have to say, only 4 days into it, I feel better than I have felt in four years!!!!! My flu like symptoms have vanished, my pain is greatly reduced, my skin has cleared up! I now remember what it feels like to be normal again, as I feel 70% there so far. Dr. Pridgen is my hero! I feel like dancing….:o)

  • Deboruth

    November 11, 2016 at 2:58 am - Reply

    Fiona, I recall reading references to herbal compounds that have effects similar to Celebrex in the Cox part. Maybe you could look into those and then an extra anti-viral Just a wild and crazy thought, but I’m allergic to Sulfa drugs also!

  • BP

    November 15, 2016 at 12:25 pm - Reply

    I would like to know about if an elderly patient (75yrs) already on other ARVs (HAART) and is already on Lyrica could have any further benefits from adding Celebrex only, or does it only work with famciclovir?

    Also, with Lyrica, how long does it take to start noticing significant reduction in symptoms of fibromyalgia?

  • Sarah

    November 15, 2016 at 2:15 pm - Reply

    I am now in complete remission from Fibromyalgia using a 6 month antiviral acyclovir treatment (confirmed with a viral panel) coupled with avoiding foods that were positive on my food sensitivity test and affecting my immune system. I went from bedridden at 34 to working full time, playing on a flag football team and I just ran my first 5k. Antiviral treatment gave me a life again! I now stay on top of my immune system to avoid relapse but I know I may need the treatment again one day if my immune system ever weakens and the dormant viruses resurface. I’m completely off ALL of my fibromyalgia medications and have been for over 6 months. Cort, I sent you my story via FB messenger but I can tell you more about the treatment if you’d like.

    • Lynn-Z

      February 14, 2017 at 8:31 pm - Reply

      Hi Sarah, I was interested in hearing more about your program and wondered if Cort posted it? Perhaps I’ve missed it.

      I can give you my contact info if you would like to send it to me directly. Thanks for sharing some good news!

  • Teri Richardson

    November 15, 2016 at 8:34 pm - Reply

    Is the research for fibromyalgia only,or is it for CFS/ME also? I’ve had CFS for 14 years,and live in Michigan.I was a patient of Dr.Lerner in 2008/2009.I can’t find a CFS doctor near me,could you possibly work with my primary physician?

    • Cort Johnson

      November 26, 2016 at 7:03 pm - Reply

      Dr. Pridgen believes the same issue applies for ME/CFS. Dr. Pridgen does consult with primary care physicians. I believe Dr. Pridgen is found in Tuscaloosa, Alabama

  • Ruth

    December 17, 2016 at 1:29 pm - Reply

    I have been on high dose Valaciclovir (3g per day) for the last 5 years. Whilst my ME and fibro are improved I still have regular flare ups and am still housebound. I wold LOVE to volunteer to take part in one of the trials -would that be possible?
    thanks,
    Ruth

  • Flopsy

    January 11, 2017 at 11:56 am - Reply

    I stumbled on a similar regime by coincidence when combining Celebrex for pain after a road traffic accident and Valtrex for a Herpes infection.

    I developed severe pain and FM type stiffness and tender points after the road traffic accident.

    Would Dr Pridgen have any theories or be happy to comment on how FM could be triggered (and then helped with a similar regime) after an accident involving being by by a motorcycle as a pedestrian and fractures / extensive bruising/ head injury?

    I’m trying to connect the accident to to HSV.

  • Laura

    January 15, 2017 at 9:41 am - Reply

    I am also very interested in taking part in the upcoming trial. I am based in central California. I have been on Lyrica for years and cannot get of of it without withdrawal symtoms. I am also on heavy pain meds. I have tried Savella as well as a wide variety of other drugs which were ineffective. I have had fibromyalgia since the 1980’s.

  • Rosanne

    March 27, 2017 at 3:15 am - Reply

    Hello there. Is Dr. Pridgen still taking new patients? I live in Iowa and I am willing to go to his office. Is it still possible to be included in the trials? I am in agony and am losing my ability to function, in all areas. Please feel free to email me. Thank you! ♡

  • Alison

    April 16, 2017 at 5:23 pm - Reply

    I too am interested in participating in the Phase III trial. I am NJ tho. I see the Phase II trials on clinicaltrials.gov were not held in NJ. Also it looks like you may still be recruiting?

  • Leave a Reply