All posts tagged antibodies

Could the Gut Cure Neuroinflammation? An MS and ME/CFS/FM Inquiry

Gut Neuroinflammation Connection Revealed

“There is something very critical about how the gut and brain are connected, and we’re starting to unravel the molecular threads behind that clinical observation. It’s a great example of how fast science can move.” Jen Gommerman – co-author

Limiting our attention solely to chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), fibromyalgia (FM) and allied disorders might be a mistake. Recent studies indicate that ME/CFS and FM fit into the broad category of neuroinflammatory disorders which include multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson’s disease and others.

ME/CFS and FM neuroinflammatory

ME/CFS and FM may fit into a broad spectrum of neuroinflammatory disorders.

The same parts of the brain may not be affected in each disease, but it’s possible that each is undergirded by a similar inflammatory milieu. If the goal is to reduce neuroinflammation, then an approach that works in one disease could work in another.

The immense amount of research being devoted to these other neuroinflammatory disorders suggests they could provide critical insights into ME/CFS and FM as well.

A recent multiple sclerosis gut study provided a prime example of how progress in one neuroinflammatory disease may benefit others. It underscored the gut’s long reach and illuminated a potential treatment approach – not just for MS, but possibly also for other neuroinflammatory diseases.

It raised the possibility that manipulating one’s gut bacteria may at some point become an effective treatment approach in the fight against neuroinflammation.

Cell. 2018 Dec 21. pii: S0092-8674(18)31560-5. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2018.11.035. [Epub ahead of print] Recirculating Intestinal IgA-Producing Cells Regulate Neuroinflammation via IL-10. Rojas OL1, Pröbstel AK2, Porfilio EA1, Wang AA1, Charabati M3, Sun T1, Lee DSW1, Galicia G1, Ramaglia V1, Ward LA1, Leung LYT1, Najafi G1, Khaleghi K1, Garcillán B4, Li A5, Besla R6, Naouar I1, Cao EY1, Chiaranunt P1, Burrows K1, Robinson HG7, Allanach JR7, Yam J1, Luck H5, Campbell DJ8, Allman D9, Brooks DG10, Tomura M11, Baumann R2, Zamvil SS12, Bar-Or A13, Horwitz MS14, Winer DA6, Mortha A1, Mackay F4, Prat A3, Osborne LC7, Robbins C15, Baranzini SE16, Gommerman JL17.

Their study started in the head and moved downwards. Researchers wondered where the heck the plasma cells (IgA antibody producing B-cells) showing up in the central nervous systems of MS patients were coming from. It turned out they were coming from the gut.  They found that B-cells were making their way to the gut where gut bacteria where flipping their switch – and turning them into IgA producing plasma cells. Now their one and only goal was to produce IgA antibodies.

IgA antibody gut chronic fatigue

IgA antibody producing cells that are formed in the gut appear to play a major role in tamping down inflammation in the brain

Eventually they made their way up the body to the brain, where (in the presence of IL-10) they were tamping down inflammation. Interestingly, the guts of the mouse model for MS were deficient in these cells. These plasma B-cells were so effective at reducing brain inflammation that boosting their levels in the mice’s guts returned them to health.

The levels of these plasma cells are also reduced in the guts of humans during MS relapses – presumably because they’re being recruited to the brain to fight the inflammation.

This finding cleared up a conundrum – why knocking out B-cells tended to help people with MS while knocking out only the IgA-producing cells made them worse. B-cells were believed to promote neuroinflammation and autoimmunity and they do. The B-cell inhibitors used are believed to reduce T-cell activation and suppress autoantibody production.

No one suspected, though, that specialized B-cells might also play a critical role in suppressing inflammation. Knocking those cells out resulted in the patients getting worse.

Gut Modification

“Showing that IgA-producing B cells can travel from the gut to the brain opens a new page in the book of neuroinflammatory diseases and could be the first step towards producing novel treatments to modulate or stop MS and related neurological disorders.” Sergio Baranzini – co-author

The next steps seem clear: find a way to increase the number of IgA-producing plasma cells in the guts of people with neuroinflammatory disorders in the hope that they will knock down inflammation in the brain. Because some bacteria – which ones is unknown at the moment – trigger B-cells in the gut to change to IgA producing plasma B-cells, the next step is to identify that microbe and find a way to increase its numbers.  In other words, find a way for the gut to naturally reduce inflammation in the brain.

“If we can understand what these cells are reacting to, we can potentially treat MS by modulating our gut commensals. That might be easier than getting drugs into the brain, which is a strategy that hasn’t always worked in MS.” Gommerman – senior author

Potential Relevance to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), Fibromyalgia, etc.

“As a clinician-scientist, it is exciting that our experiments linking preclinical animal models to the biology we see in real MS patients may have uncovered a general mechanism for how the immune system counteracts inflammation.” Pröbstel – co-author

Chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is not MS but the two diseases might be more closely related than one might think. Having mononucleosis/glandular fever increases the risk of coming down with either ME/CFS or MS and infections often trigger relapses in both diseases. The most disabling symptom in MS tends to be fatigue and both diseases mostly affect women. Plus pregnancy often brings a (temporary) respite in both diseases.

A Simmaron Research Foundation sponsored spinal fluid study found similar levels of immune alterations in ME/CFS and MS, and pointed to a major, almost MS-like, alteration of immune factors in ME/CFS.

Simmaron’s Spinal Fluid Study Finds Dramatic Differences in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Jarred Younger, who knows neuroinflammation as well as anyone in this field, believes that MS and ME/CFS could turn out to be close cousins. Younger believes the neuroinflammation present in both diseases may be similar, with the notable distinction that the immune cells in MS have been tweaked to attack the neurons, while those in ME/CFS, thankfully, have not. (Younger has begun a low dose naltrexone trial in early stage MS patients to see if he can stop the neuroinflammation before it has irrevocably damaged the nerves.)

 

Jarred Younger III : Treatments – A Better LDN and the Hunt for Microglia Inhibitors

What works in MS could work in ME/CFS and it already has – at least in two cases. A MS drug called Copaxone was very effective in two ME/CFS patients who’d been misdiagnosed with MS. In fact, it was much more effective in those patients – resulting in significant reductions in fatigue –  than it ever was in MS.

The really exciting thing about this study is its potential relatability to other diseases.  These researchers appeared to have stumbled upon a basic gut induced anti-inflammatory pathway that may help with other neuroinflammatory diseases including, who knows, perhaps ME/CFS and FM.

It’s clear that we can’t view MS as strictly a brain disease. Yes, the overt physical damage occurs in the brain, but gut issues play a role as well. In fact, this study suggests the possibility that gut damage – in the form of a dysregulated microbiome – might even play a critical role in allowing MS to progress.

Could the Gut Be a Potential Drug Factory?

Given the possibility that harnessing an as yet unknown microbe in the gut could reduce inflammation in the brain, one has to wonder if the gut, with its trillions of microbes, is a potential reservoir of drugs.  Could we tweak the microbes in the gut to provide other factors that reduce disease? Will gut manipulation ultimately play an important role in treating chronic diseases?

Montreal ME/CFS II: Stopping PEM, the Antibody Subset and Unutmaz’s Big Surprise

The second part of a several part series on the Montreal ME/CFS conference focuses on the immune system.

Part 1: The Montreal ME/CFS Conference: Metabolism and Exercise can be viewed here.

Dr. Nancy Klimas: From Biomarkers to Modeling and Clinical Trials; GWS and ME/CFS

Years of work appear to be coming to fruition for Dr. Klimas. Her ability to hook into GWS funding has made a huge difference in her ability to test out her modeling protocols.  It’s remarkable to see the Dept of Defense lay down $40 million per year for the vets affected during the Gulf War 27 years ago, while ME/CFS gets so little. The vets undoubtedly deserve it and they deserve more – many lives were shredded as a result of the war and they’ve fought for years to get recognition. However, the disconnect between the way the feds have treated GWI and ME/CFS – a disease which affects far more people – is startling.  The Dept of Defense hasn’t done great by its vets, but it’s been much more responsive to them than the feds have been to ME/CFS and fibromyalgia.

Nancy Klimas

Years of work appear to be coming to fruition for Dr. Klimas

Dr. Klimas noted that the more we look, the more immune abnormalities are being found.  Cytokines may not tell us what is causing ME/CFS, but they sure could help us find drugs to combat it.  Klimas is comparing the immune signatures she’s seeing in ME/CFS with those of other diseases and then checking out what’s working in those diseases. The good news is that immune-affecting drugs are big business now, with more and more coming on the market. If ME/CFS is, at its heart, an immune disorder, or if the immune system plays a large role – as many think it does – drugs developed for other diseases may be able to help.

Dr. Klimas and her researchers have been asserting for years that ME/CFS patients are stuck in a kind of suboptimal, self-reinforcing homeostatic space; i.e. their systems have been rewired to produce a new normal.

That idea doesn’t seem to be all that far from Naviaux’s belief that people with ME/CFS are stuck in a Dauer state or Dr. Cheney’s report that while he could push patients towards health, something would pull them back.  Both Klimas and Naviaux believe a series of structured moves will be needed to move the system back to normal. Neither believes it’s easy; Klimas says real “force” will be needed to move the system back into health.

Klimas should know – she’s been intensively charting how ME/CFS patients’ systems go off the rails during exercise for several years now. She’s measured every cytokine, neuropeptide, etc. she can at 8 timepoints before, during and after exercise in 50 women with ME/CFS, 25 women with FM, 50 men with ME/CFS and 50 men with GWI.

She’s gathered a vast amount of data and that data is telling her that ME/CFS patients’ immune systems basically go nuts during the first 15 minutes of exercise.  Four hours later, oxidative stress kicks in and the autonomic nervous and endocrine systems and metabolism get hit — but it’s the immune system that kicks everything off.

The big surprise is how different chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is from Gulf War Illness. The metabolism gets hit hard in ME/CFS – everything gets shut down – but in GWI, all the pathways are ramped up. They’re two completely different illnesses which from the outside look exactly the same.

Dr. Klimas and her team have been running sophisticated modeling techniques on supercomputers to figure out how to get our systems back to normal. Initially, they ran into trouble with women who, no surprise, have much more complex systems than men. Back to the drawing board they went. In the end, Dr. Klimas’s team was able to create a virtual clinical trial in GWS. First, they brought down brain inflammation using etanercept, and then readjusted the HPA axis with a glucocorticoid receptor blocker, mifeprestone.

It worked on the computer – their virtual GWS patient returned to health system – but the big test came with their Gulf War Syndrome mouse model.  When the drug combo was able to return the GWS mouse to health they really knew they were onto something. An open label phase I trial in GWS is under way as we speak.

supercomputers ME/CFS

Her team has used supercomputers to create virtual clinical trials

Dr. Klimas noted that the $30 million the DOD is providing for GWI has made a big difference where the rubber meets the road in medicine – in ten clinical trials that are underway. That’s in a disease that effects fewer people than ME/CFS but which receives federal funding for clinical trials.  That’s not true for chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) – federal funding for clinical trials is pretty much blocked.

Researchers can apply for clinical trial funding at NINDS and other institutes, but ME/CFS doesn’t have a chance against diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The big issue is that the program announcement for ME/CFS – which lists subjects researchers can apply to study – doesn’t allow them to submit clinical trials proposals.

Dr. Koroshetz’s promise last year to get that language embedded into the ME/CFS PA hasn’t paid off yet. Getting that wording embedded into the PA for ME/CFS could open up funding for clinical trials. That would be a big step forward.

Dr. Klimas doesn’t have a mouse model for ME/CFS but she’s been doing the same computer modeling she used in GWS on ME/CFS. It’s clear that nobody at this point understands more about what happens during exercise in ME/CFS than Dr. Klimas. Nobody has been able to translate mountains of exercise data into virtual clinical trials. Nobody has proposed a staggered two-drug approach to ME/CFS, and nobody probably has a better shot at stopping PEM than her.  This is new stuff not just for us but for the medical field in general. Let’s hope it works out.

The GWS trial is underway and she hopes to get her chance at halting the PEM in its tracks in ME/CFS in a small trial later this year. Getting funding, of course, will be crucial.

ME/CFS rather suddenly has several drug/drug trial possibilities: they include Cortene, Dr. Klimas’s drug combo, immunoadsorption (see below), Fluge and Mella’s Norwegian cyclophosphamide trial,  Ampligen and Dr. Kaiser’s Synergy drug-nutrient combination – and, of course, Rituximab is still surely in the picture for a subset of patients.

Carmen Scheibenbogen

Scheibenbogen is a mover and shaker. She’s published six papers on ME/CFS in the past three years, is a leader in the Euromene Group, has been talking to pharmaceutical companies about drugs, and is organizing a fatigue conference in Germany to get some good networking going.

Rowe - scheibenbogen - ME/CFS

Dr. Rowe called Dr. Scheibenbogen’s antibody findings one of the most exciting ME/CFS research findings in years.

Peter Rowe called her recent autoantibody papers one of the most exciting recent developments in the field. Scheibenbogen, interestingly, got the idea to do those studies from similar recent findings in POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome).

Scheibenbogen rattled off some of the commonalities between autoimmune diseases and ME/CFS. Both predominantly affect women, both are often triggered by an infection and she’s found a high family history of autoimmunity in ME/CFS.  Plus, Epstein-Barr virus – a common trigger in chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) – invades B-cells which are the main drivers of autoimmunity. The difficulty ME/CFS patients and others have fighting off the virus when exposed to it later in life apparently gives the immune system plenty of opportunity to make a mistake and begin attacking our own tissues.

Check out a recent breakthrough in EBV-associated autoimmunity

The Autoimmune Virus? Groundbreaking EBV Finding Could Help Explain ME/CFS

Rituximab is used to treat autoimmune diseases. The Rituximab ME/CFS trial’s main endpoint failed but Scheibenbogen asserted that we shouldn’t count Rituximab out at all. She believes, and she would know, because she’s studied Rituximab patients, that Rituximab will be shown to be effective in a subset of patients.  An effective treatment in a subset of ME/CFS patients would be a big deal – particularly for those patients.

Scheibenbogen found increased levels of antibodies in about 40% of ME/CFS patients, and Bergquist’s study that is currently underway thankfully had similar results. At least right now it appears that the 40% figure is solid, but the search for antibodies in ME/CFS is not over. When I asked Scheibenbogen if other antibodies might be involved, she said, yes, other antibodies probably will apply. If that’s so, that 40% number could go up. Scheibenbogen noted that the B2 and muscarinic antibodies that have been showing up in ME/CFS are part of a larger network.

Interestingly, these are not autoantibodies; they’re natural antibodies which affect breathing, the circulation and the gut. Their high levels in ME/CFS appear to be throwing those systems off.

Immunoadsorption

Immunoadsorption is another possible immune treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Immunoadsorption, which is similar to, but more effective than plasmaphoresis, removes IgG autoantibodies from the blood. It’s an expensive treatment – about $20,000.

Like Rituximab it will probably be effective in a subset of patients. Scheibenbogen’s small immunoadsorption trial of ME/CFS patients with specific autoantibodies found that the treatment did what it was supposed to do – it significantly reduced antibody levels for at least six months.

Symptoms improved in most patients and some patients completely recovered. Three are still in remission a year after the treatment ended. One person completely recovered for 6-7 weeks but then relapsed. After she relapsed, she could hardly walk again. The trial suggested that Scheibenbogen is on the right track with her autoimmune studies. The fact that POTS is so prevalent in ME/CFS and has similar autoantibody issues suggests that the outcome is not such a surprise.

The trial was small and carefully curated to those with high antibody levels but most patients improved and some recovered

The trial was small and carefully curated to those with high antibody levels but most patients improved and some recovered

A follow-up study is beginning. If that works out, Scheibenbogen hopes for a big trial that will settle the issue definitively.  In a good sign, she reported that the company that produces the immunoadsorption treatment (not available in the U.S.) is quite interested in ME/CFS.

(Even if the treatment is not available in the U.S., a successful trial could do a couple of things: it could prompt the company to make the treatment available in the U.S., and it would surely enhance autoimmunity research. We’ll see what happens, but if we can come up with several treatments – each of which is effective in a subset of patients – we’ll start to whittle the disease down.)

As she left for the airport, Scheibenbogen said she hopes that in the next five years ways to diagnose and treat ME/CFS will be found. Let it be so…

Guidelines to Biomarker Produced

Euromene, the new ME/CFS European research group Scheibenbogen is working with, recently laid out a step-by-step pathway to develop a biomarker. She noted that we have lots of interesting findings, but none that are unique to ME/CFS. Plus, the findings we do have overlap too much with healthy controls.

In short, we haven’t found that key signature – that key physiological mark – which says a person has ME/CFS. (That may not be a surprise: until we find the core of ME/CFS, we may not be able to find a unique biomarker). Scheibenbogen did wonder, however, given Maureen Hanson’s recent inability to find subsets in her metabolomic data, if the biomarker for ME/CFS will be metabolic in nature.

 

Unutmaz’s Big Surprise

Ron Davis has noted things often don’t work out the way researchers expect them to. Apparently, Derya Unutmaz feels the same way.  Unutmaz got a T-cell result that pointed straight at the gut and then was pleasantly shocked when a look at the gut confirmed his findings.  He was expecting a few more twists and turns from the body! It’s not usually so easy.

He noted that over the past decade a tremendous amount of work has been done on the effects the gut microbiome (gut bacteria) have on the immune system. It’s now clear that a shift toward more inflammatory bacteria in the gut can result in inflammation in other parts of the body. In fact, Unutmaz reported that just about every disease is associated with a change in gut bacteria.  The bacteria play such a vital role that oncologists can even determine how effectively patients will respond to immunotherapies by assessing the kind of bacteria they carry in their guts.

That makes sense for ME/CFS, since every gut bacteria study has thus far found substantial alterations in the bacteria in ME/CFS patients’ guts.

Unutmaz is a T-cell guy. He knows that bacterial metabolic by-products trigger unusual T-cells called  MAIT T-cells (Mucosal associated invariant T cells) to get into action. Once these cells, which are found in our gut lining, liver, lungs, etc., come across those metabolites, they secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. Those cytokines turn monocyte cells into hairy monsters called macrophages which then gobble up the bacterial-infected cells.

MAIT cells, then, play a key role in turning on our immune response to the bad bacteria that can live in our guts. They apparently lurk in the gut lining as a kind of last line of defense against those bacteria getting into our blood stream and invading the rest of the body.

gut bacteria chronic fatigue

Unutmaz’s findings suggested that T-cells in the ME/CFS patients’ guts had been repeatedly exposed to bad bacteria

Unutmaz found that a high percentage of MAIT cells had been repeatedly activated in ME/CFS patients – suggesting a plethora of bad bacteria was present. In true ME/CFS fashion, Unutmaz also found that ME/CFS patients’ MAIT cells were activated — but “punked out” at the same time. (A wired and tired immune cell?).  Seemingly exhausted by the continual stimulation, they (like their natural killer cell cousins) had problems killing infected cells. That hearkened back to the Lipkin/Hornig immune finding of activated immune systems in early-duration ME/CFS patients and depleted immune systems in longer- duration patients.

Unutmaz is now trying to identify which bacteria are tweaking ME/CFS patients’ MAIT T-cells so much as to possibly burn them out. If he’s successful, he may have found a target that could quiet down a possibly overworked and burnt-out immune system and allow it to rejuvenate.

Are Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) and Fibromyalgia Immune Exhaustion Disorders?

Part 1: The Montreal ME/CFS Conference: Metabolism and Exercise