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Peterson’s Atypical Subset Opens New View of ME/CFS in Columbia/Simmaron Publication

“We now have biological evidence that the triggers for ME/CFS may involve distinct pathways to disease, or, in some cases, predispose individuals to the later development of serious comorbidities.” Dr. Mady Hornig. 

The Subset Makers

Simmaron Research | Scientifically Redefining ME CFS | #ShakeTheCFSstigmaOver the past couple of years the Simmaron Research Foundation and Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University and others have begun to pump out some long awaited subsets. This week, new findings were published by Columbia and Simmaron that define 2 subsets.

They’re not the usual suspects (infectious trigger vs non-infectious trigger; gradual onset vs acute onset). In fact, they involve subsets few would have predicted a couple of years ago. They suggest that we might be in for some real surprises over time.

Short Duration vs Long Duration Subset: Two years ago, the Simmaron Research Foundation collaborated with Ian Lipkin and other doctors to uncover a subset few had anticipated: short duration patients vs long duration patients.

The Atypical Patient or “Peterson Subset”:  Now comes a subset of atypical chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) patients (the “Peterson Subset”) that Dr. Peterson had long wondered about. These patients had ME/CFS but tended to follow a different course. Some had had unusual exposures (unusual infections, blood transfusions); others developed serious illnesses (cancer, autoimmune diseases, etc.) that Dr. Peterson didn’t see in the rest of the population.

Dr. Hornig talked about how the atypical subset came about. Like so many breakthroughs in medicine it took a careful and observant doctor/researcher to bring it about. This study, she said, was a testament to:

“Dr. Peterson’s clinical acumen, his long-term follow up of this patient population and his attentiveness to the full range of complex, serious medical disorders that might develop. The classical group had been followed for similar lengths of time but had not developed these more severe, serious comorbidities.”

The atypical vs classical distinction was pre-established by Dr. Peterson before the analysis. Based on his wide-ranging clinical experience, the atypical group stood out for either: 1) the presence of unusual precursors (triggers) of ME/CFS or; 2) the development of more unusual and severe comorbidities over varying (and often long-term) intervals after ME/CFS onset.”

atypical subset

The atypical group turned out to be quite different

Dr. Peterson felt the unusual outcomes weren’t just the result of chance: something different was going on – something that he felt as a doctor needed to be identified. What if, he thought, there was a way to identify these unusual patients before they started developing these significant illnesses. Then he could do more extensive cancer or immune screens and watch these patients more closely.

Plus, these patients could be inadvertently bollixing up the results of ME/CFS studies. Peterson was so sure, in fact, this subset was different that he had its effects assessed during the first Simmaron/CII spinal fluid study. Peterson turned out to be right: the atypical subset had such an effect on the results that it had to be removed.

The next step was a study comparing the two groups. Using Dr. Peterson’s spinal fluid samples, The Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia found that “Peterson Subset” not only had markedly different immune findings but displayed a different pattern of immune results as well. Dr. Peterson is Scientific Advisor to Simmaron and Gunnar Gottschalk was its Research Manager.

Immune network analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome with atypical and classical presentations M Hornig1,2, CG Gottschalk3, ML Eddy1, X Che1, JE Ukaigwe1, DL Peterson3 and WI Lipkin. Translational Psychiatry (2017) 7, e1080; doi:10.1038/tp.2017.44; published online 4 April 2017

 The Atypical Subset

What does a typical chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) patient look like? Something like someone who suddenly comes down with a flu-like illness and never recovers. They may get better or they may get worse, but they don’t come down with cancer, an autoimmune illness, seizures or other significant illnesses.

An atypical patient, on the other hand, might have a history of viral infection (viral encephalitis) or have been exposed to unusual pathogens during foreign travel or had a blood transfusion before becoming ill. They also tended to be more severely cognitively impaired and had more neurological complaints.  They tended to suffer from severe diseases as well.

Many of these illnesses appeared long after the ME/CFS diagnosis. In fact, at the time of diagnosis these patients looked like a typical ME/CFS patient. This study suggests, though, that very early on, something different was happening in their central nervous systems.

The Atypical Patients in the Study (the “Peterson Subset”):

  • Atypical multiple sclerosis – 3
  • Other autoimmune/inflammatory disorders – 4
  • Cancer – 8 (brain-3, breast-2, lymphoma -2, pancreatic-1)
  • Infections – 2 (West Nile Virus encephalitis – 1; Unspecified viral encephalitis – 1)
  • Illness during foreign travel – 2
  • Illness after blood transfusion – 1
  • Seizure disorder – 6
  • Gulf War Illness – 1

Immune “Exhaustion”?

This “broadly based” immune study compared 51 cytokines and other immune factors in the cerebral spinal fluid of 32 typical and 19 atypical ME/CFS patients. These numbers at first glance may seem small but they’re actually quite large for spinal fluid studies.

The Simmaron Research Foundation/Center for Infection and Immunity’s prior studies suggested that typical ME/CFS patients’ immune systems went on high alert for the first couple of years of illness but then went into slumber mode. In fact, it was more than slumber mode: their immune activity essentially tanked – leading to the hypothesis that frantic activity of the first couple of years might have left their immune systems depleted.

autoimmune diseases

Autoimmune diseases were amongst the unusual comorbidities found in the atypical subset.

This study suggests that the “Peterson Subset” follows a markedly different pattern. The major burst of immune activity early on followed by equally dramatic downturns found in the typical patients is gone. Instead the study suggests that the immune systems of the atypical patients essentially started off low and stayed low.

Almost half the immune factors tested (IL1β, IL5, IL7, IL13, IL17A, IFNα2, IFNγ, TNFα, TRAIL (TNFSF10), CCL2, CCL7, CXCL5, CXCL9, CSF3 (GCSF), βNGF, resistin, serpin E1) were lower early in the illness in the atypical group.

As the illness proceeded, though, the pattern changed again: the atypical groups’ immune system actually revved up again.

When I asked if immune exhaustion was bringing the immune system down early in the atypical group, Mady Hornig replied:

 “We don’t know yet. Our additional finding of an interaction of diagnostic subset with duration of illness – wherein the atypical group showed a pattern of increased levels of immune molecules with longer duration of illness, as opposed to the dampened immune profiles in the classical group with longer illness duration compared to classical ME/CFS in the early stages of disease  (as we had seen in the immune profiling work based on plasma samples) – suggests that the response tends to be more suppressed at the onset of ME/CFS in the atypical group.”

Could that dampened immune response early in their illness be contributing to the illnesses the atypical group experienced later? Dr. Hornig again cautioned about the need to replicate the study but suggested it might.  A viral trigger could have blasted their immune systems or vice versa – a problematic immune system could have allowed a virus in …

 “However, dampening of inflammatory (so-called Th1/Th17-type) responses might be expected to restrict an individual’s ability to keep problematic microbes from replicating. Certain viruses – even common ones implicated in ME/CFS in some studies, such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) – are well-known to be associated with development of certain cancers; however, only a fraction of those infected with EBV develop cancers.

It is a bit of a chicken-egg conundrum: EBV could alter immune responses of T/NK cells to increase cancer risk, or altered T/NK responses at the time of EBV infection could be the critical factor. Alternatively, reduced Th1/Th17-type immune profiles after infection – along with reduced T regulatory cell responses – might skew some individuals toward autoimmunity, raising the risk for more severe autoimmune diseases, including atypical multiple sclerosis or even autoimmune-mediated epileptiform disorders. But at this early juncture this remains only speculation.”

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) brings up the age and exposure question. It’s much more difficult for the immune system to corral or ward off EBV if EBV is encountered for the first time at a later age (during or after adolescence). That difficulty shows up as the months long fight to beat EBV called infectious mononucleosis.

A meta-analysis of studies examining many environmental risk factors for multiple sclerosis (including vaccinations, comorbid diseases, surgeries, traumatic events and accidents, exposure to environmental agents, and biochemical, infectious, and musculoskeletal biomarkers) found that only three were associated with an increased risk of coming down with MS. Two of those concerned EBV (having had infectious mononucleosis, IgG seropositivity to EBNA). (The last significant factor was smoking).

Could a later exposure to EBV which resulted in infectious mononucleosis be the straw, so to speak, that ultimately broke the camel’s back for some of the atypical patients?

Dr. Hornig agreed that a study parsing out the rates of infectious mononucleosis in ME/CFS could be helpful but said it was hard to know at this point if IM played a role. She said that the CII group was investigating EBV further:

 “Hard to know (if late exposure to EBV is involved)- we are looking for clues suggesting greater risk for autoantibody-mediated disease in EBV and other virally-exposed subsets of ME/CFS. We do know that females have higher risk for autoimmune disease, but the sex skew only begins after puberty (when females might have come down with IM [Infectious Mononucleosis]).”

Poor Networking

Not only was less immune activation present earlier in the atypical groups but a network analysis indicated a weaker immune network was present as well. These network analyses assess the “wiring” present in the complex immune system.

Immune mediators called cytokines (and other immune factors) form these networks when they communicate with each other to drive an effective immune response.  While a central immune network was found in the typical patients, no such network connection was found in the atypical group.  That suggested a less robust immune response was occurring.

Pro-inflammatory Markers Down

pathogen

A less than robust immune response to an infection could play a role in the atypical group.

Surprisingly, the atypical group’s spinal fluid had lower levels of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL17A and CXCL9.  Given the atypical group’s increased neurological and cognitive problems one would have expected the opposite.

That suggested that the atypical patients might be more than different in degree; they might be different in kind. The TH17 pathway that underlies many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, and which the authors believes may be contributing to the typical ME/CFS group, doesn’t appear to be in play in the atypical group. In fact, the authors suggested the researchers vigorously pursue “alternate, nonimmune mechanisms of pathogenesis in more complex, atypical patients with ME/CFS.”

Dr. Hornig suggested genetics might play a role or that a different kind of immune response; one that was a bit too weak early on to knock off a pathogen, was another possibility.

“I think it may rather be the kind of immune response (inadequate inflammatory responses that might serve to contain an infectious agent upon first exposure, with skew towards autoimmunity or permissiveness to later uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells – i.e., neoplasia) and its timing (too little early on, with some limited immune escape at later time points, allowing for some inappropriate inflammatory type responses after the infectious agent has already had an opportunity to set destructive processes in motion – but too little and too late to contain or eradicate the pathogen).”

That could set up what Dr. Hornig called a “smoldering inflammatory process”.

Cause(s)

What might be causing the immune systems of the atypical group to act so differently early on? Dr. Hornig warned that it was essential that the study results be confirmed by a larger study but suggested that different triggers (unusual infections) or genetic vulnerabilities  (environmental susceptibility, immune response, autoimmunity genes) or even one’s age at exposure could play a role.

Results Suggest Atypical ME/CFS Patients Should Be Screened for Cancer and other Diseases

As with any single study the results need to be validated in studies by other labs using other patients to be validated. If they are, though, they could help doctors and patients. Dr. Peterson said:

 “Early identification of patients who meet the usual clinical criteria when first diagnosed but then go on to develop atypical features would help clinicians like myself identify and treat these complex cases and even prevent fatal outcomes.”

Hornig and Lipkin suggested that atypical ME/CFS patients should be screened for cancer just as patients with paraneoplastic syndromes are. Paraneoplastic syndrome occurs when an immune response against cancer affects other parts of the body, often before a diagnosis of cancer is made.

How Common are Atypical Patients?

How many patients are “atypical”? In her answer to that question Mady Hornig called for more comprehensive studies to fully understand ME/CFS.

 “Though we know comorbidity rates in ME/CFS are thought to be high for quite a number of conditions (allergies, gastrointestinal problems), few studies have addressed this issue in a systematic manner.

It is rare to find physicians who specialize in this disorder, let alone follow the same individuals over time. Given the finding that prior to the development of these other serious comorbidities, all members of this subset met research diagnostic criteria for ME/CFS and would only later qualify as “atypical” based on subsequently developing comorbidities (over many years), we desperately need longitudinal studies that monitor for such issues.

The bottom line is that we don’t know what percentage of ME/CFS patients are “atypical”.”

It’s not clear what percentage of ME/CFS patients are atypical but they may  have already had a dramatic impact on ME/CFS research and treatment. Dr’s Fluge and Mella started the Rituximab saga in ME/CFS after noticing improvements in the fatigue, etc. of ME/CFS patients who’d come down with cancer; i.e. atypical patients.

Dr. Hornig has called the spinal fluid samples Dr. Peterson has collected over the years a “precious” resource, and she highlighted his persistence in collecting them over the years.

 “There also may be long-term cohorts at some ME/CFS clinical sites that might be available for closer examination, at least with respect to clinical patterns and disease/comorbidity trajectories. But most of these sites are unlikely to have cerebrospinal fluid samples (let alone plasma samples) banked in a repository for years!

The suggestion that biological pathways in the CNS already look different even before the onset of these comorbidities implies not only that screening and surveillance are likely to be important to ensure better long term care for individuals with ME/CFS, but also that treatment might need to be tailored differently in classical vs. atypical subsets.”

 Similar Issues Showing Up in Other Neurological Diseases

subsets chronic fatigue

Subsets are common in neurological diseases.

Gunnar Gottschalk, a co-author of the study and medical student is a former research manager for Simmaron Research Foundation. He’s been deeply immersed in ME/CFS research for several years and continues as a Trustee of the Foundation.  Gunnar noted that the neuroscience lab he is working in is studying similar issues in Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases. It’s not that the same findings are present but that highly abnormal spinal fluid cytokine findings are showing up in all these diseases –  including ME/CFS.

Nor is this study’s general finding – that atypical patients can be differentiated from typical patients in ME/CFS – unusual in the neuroscience field.  Virtually every neurological disease, Gunnar said, appears to be studded with subsets. Different types of multiple sclerosis, for instance, have been identified using similar kinds of spinal fluid analyses.

Noting that developing animal models are critical to understand what’s happening in the brain, Gunnar said he wouldn’t be surprised at all if some animal models which have been developed at great cost for other diseases wouldn’t eventually be helpful in some ways for ME/CFS.

SR_Donate_6.9.14_5

Next Steps

This is not it for the spinal fluid and the atypical patients. Metabolomics and proteomics studies are next in Phase 2 of the study, which is being funded by Simmaron.  Gunnar noted that the cytokine studies can identify important pathways, but the metabolomics studies can provide more detailed results and he’s eager to see how they turn out.

Dr. Hornig has a long, long list of studies she’d love to do in ME/CFS. This is a disease, she feels, that is calling out for comprehensive studies. She wants to analyze blood, fecal and spinal fluid samples collected at the same time to assess what infection or environmental insult the patient is reacting to.

Comparing immune profiles in the blood and spinal fluid could, for instance, help tell her whether powerful immune cells are squeezing though the blood-brain barrier and wreaking havoc in the brain. Determining that immune cells from the periphery are in the brain would open an entirely new window on ME/CFS.

The gut is another area primed for research. Dr. Hornig pointed out that it’s clear that the bacterial communities in our gut shape our immune response. The TH17 profile found in some patients that tilts the immune system towards inflammation could derive from danger signals produced in the gut. Similarly the TH2 profile found in other patients that tilts them towards autoimmunity could come from the gut as well.

What Dr. Hornig wants is “system-biology” work that ties all these systems into a coherent whole. A gut level disturbance could, for instance, end up impacting virtually every system involved in ME/CFS – including the central nervous system.

“Further systems biology-type work will help us delineate how altered gut microbiota might translate into faulty signals – ranging from bacterial or human metabolites, including a range of immunity-modifying and neuroactive molecules, to immune molecules, to autonomic/vagal nerve axis effects – that then access the CNS (perhaps involving damage to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier to allow entrance of these aberrant signaling molecules) and disrupt brain function.”

In fact, Mady Hornig and Ian Lipkin do have most of the samples they need to begin this work. In what must have been one of the stranger NIH grant awards ever, however, the NIH funded the collection of an enormous amount of samples taken at four points over a year in 250 ME/CFS and healthy controls, but has not funded the analysis of these very same samples.

“In the more recent longitudinal NIH study we have no funding at all for laboratory studies, but have a unique banked set of well-characterized samples (oral, fecal and blood).” (bold added)

Having so many samples just sitting there is astonishing, and hopefully the second half of the study will get funded.

When I asked Dr. Hornig about funding the metabolomics and proteomics work she said that the metabolomics and proteomics assays had been run – but only for a subset of patients.  The CII, she said had funding:

 “Only for analysis of a subset of the Chronic Fatigue Initiative main study cohort samples (and this assay work is completed with analysis in progress) – not for the latest 125+ cases and 125+ controls based on the 1-year, NIH-funded study with 4 serial sample collections.

We don’t have any funding to follow up on candidates identified, including validation, quantitation and correlation with genetic, epigenetic and RNA-based assays.”

 A Foundational Approach To ME/CFS Proposed

foundational study

Large foundational studies are needed to take ME/CFS to the next level

Dr. Hornig went further, though, and called for a “foundational” approach to chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) that included national registries which would be able to tease out subsets and determine just what happens as people get ME/CFS.

“To support this sort of work on a larger scale, fundamental and foundational work is required. National registries of ME/CFS populations could be developed that would have the capacity to identify the range of preceding potential triggers to disease, to define comorbidities at the time of diagnosis, as well as to longitudinally track the new occurrence of comorbidities in ME/CFS populations over time.”

That is the kind of vision this field needs.  That is the kind of vision that should be able to excite NIH and other funders.

The Simmaron Research Foundation’s unique spinal fluid work with the CII has thus far helped to identify two potential subsets in ME/CFS.  Validating the atypical or “Peterson Subset” could lead to a new understanding of how ME/CFS works and open new treatment options for patients.  The SRF looks forward to further collaborations with the Center for Infection and Immunity and Mady Hornig and Ian Lipkin as it works to redefine ME/CFS biologically.

Simmaron Research | Give | Donate | Scientifically Redefining ME/CFS

 

Poll Note: The poll will only allow one option to be picked. One positive response suggests you may be an atypical patient. Keep in mind, though, that this is early research on subsets and further studies are needed to verify the findings.

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Is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome An Inflammatory Disease? The 2016 IACFS/ME Conference Overviews Pt II

immune-systemThe immune system’s complexity reared its head again at this conference as Dr. Montoya showcased some of the findings coming out of his large immune studies at Stanford.  Montoya’s assertions that chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is similar to systemic inflammatory response syndrome and should be called an inflammatory disorder were intriguing indeed. It’s still, however, hard understand what is going on in the immune system in ME/CFS.

This is a long blog; if you just want the main findings a quickie overview is given at the end of it.

IMMUNE SYSTEM

Montoya’s huge (584 person!) and impressive immune studies –  the largest ever done in this disease – dominated several presentations.  The studies are bit unusual in that they contained about twice as many healthy controls (n=392) as patients (n=192).  Montoya posted an impressive list of 30 researchers he’s collaborating with at Stanford and elsewhere.

He spoke of a complex immune situation often characterized by both up and down immune activation, but which strongly suggested chronic fatigue syndrome is an inflammatory disorder.

Cytokine Study

Cytokines are molecules produced by immune cells that regulate immune functioning in many ways. Montoya tested many cytokines (51) but only two popped out in the first run of this study. That was surprising; large studies are particularly good at finding small but still significant differences, but this study found few differences between the ME/CFS patients and healthy controls than some smaller studies.

Lipkin and Hornig enhanced their cytokine study results by controlling for duration. The key for Montoya was severity. When he added severity to the picture, the immune findings popped out. In the more severely ill patients a rather eye-popping third of the 51 cytokines tested (leptin, CXCL-1, CXLC10, GM-SF, IFN-Y, GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-5, Il-7, IL-12p70, IL-13,  IL-17F, NGF, TGF-b, CCLI, SCF and TGF-a) – most of them pro-inflammatory in nature  – significantly increased.

Montoya proposed that TGF-b, traditionally thought of as anti-inflammatory, may have been acting as a pro-inflammatory cytokine. That cytokine has shown up in several ME/CFS studies before.

Interlude: Cytokine Results Still All Over the Map

The results were encouraging, but cytokine results in this disease are still all over the map. For years researchers have thought they MUST be involved in ME/CFS, but cytokine results have been stunningly inconsistent.

For example, while a 145 person Australian study did, like Montoya’s study, find increased levels of cytokines (IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α), none of those cytokines showed up in Montoya’s results.

igg-antibodyA 99 person study from the Klimas group measuring 16 cytokines found significant alterations in 10 of them (increased – LT-a, IL-1a, IL-1b, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-12; decreased – IL-8, IL-13 and IL-15.) IL-4/5-were increased in Montoya’s severe ME/CFS group, but IL-13 was decreased in the Klimas study and increased in Montoya’s.

Wyller’s recent large study of ME/CFS adolescents found no cytokine differences between those diagnosed with the Fukuda criteria cytokine and healthy controls. A Japanese/U.S. study found no evidence that either sleep deprivation or exercise effected cytokine levels as well.

The large Landi/Houghton 179 person study of longer duration patients found mostly cytokine reductions instead of increases (reduced levels of IL-7, IL-16, VEGF-a, CX3CLI, CXCL9; increased CCL24). If most of Montoya’s group were early-stage ME/CFS patients, that might help explain the differences, but we don’t know that they were. (Montoya did state that he is going to filter for illness duration.)

The Lipkin/Hornig cytokine study found increased levels of 16 cytokines in early or late duration patients vs healthy controls (IL-1a, IL-1ra, IL-4, IL-12p70, Il-13, CXCL8, TNFα, SFASL, CCL2, CCL3, CD40L, MCP1, TNFSF10, SCF, CFS1, and resistin).  Only three of those (IL-12p70, Il-13, SCF) were found elevated in the Montoya study; thirteen were not.

An Australian study that tracked for severity in a different way from Montoya suggested that more severe patients do have higher cytokine levels. It found reductions in IL-1b, and increases in IL-7, IL-8 and IFN-y. Of those, IFN-y was increased in the Montoya study.

In a much (much) smaller cytokine study published earlier this year, Dr. Fletcher’s study suggested that dramatic shifts in immune functioning may occur over time. IL-a plays an important role in early ME/CFS and then declines. IL-8 levels were abnormally high early on but declined to lower than normal levels after a few years. Il-6 levels were low early on and elevated later. Ironically, the Montoya study didn’t find any of these cytokines elevated in his severely ill patients.

Conclusion (?)

Until cytokine results achieve more consistency they’re clearly not going to get traction in the medical world.  The inconsistency seems surprising as most of these studies are from good labs. It’s possible, though, that subsets are mucking up the issue. Filtering for duration is clearly needed, and Montoya’s study suggested that filtering for severity is as well. The Klimas group’s Gulf War Syndrome study suggested that  gender may need to be accounted for as well.

Dr. Peterson’s atypical patient subset may throw another loop into cytokine results. Peterson’s atypical ME/CFS subset group so dramatically affected cerebral spinal fluid results that it had to be excluded from the study altogether.  Could  this group be effecting blood cytokine results as well?

Researchers are not going to stop studying cytokines – they’re apparently too enticing – and it’s possible that studies underway may help us understand what is going on.  If Lipkin/Hornig can, in their study underway, replicate their cytokine results in different duration patients – that will be something. Ditto with several good day bad day studies underway. If Montoya can duplicate the Lipkin/Hornig duration results that would really be something. Time will tell.

It’s also possible that cytokine levels per se aren’t as important as we might think. Broderick’s models suggest that context is key; in the right context a factor can be important even if it’s levels are not raised.  His models suggest that treatments targeting just two cytokines might be able to enable ME/CFS patients to exercise again. (See upcoming IACFS/ME treatment blog).

Montoya’s network analysis indicated that Il-1B – an important regulatory cytokine associated with increased pain – was the most important factor 24 hours after exercise.  That certainly makes sense given what we know about exercise and pain.

Another possibility is that cytokines in the nervous system are more important than those in the peripheral blood. It’s thought, for instance, that cytokines must contribute to central sensitivity syndromes (CSS’s) such as fibromyalgia as well, but a similar issue with consistency apparently applies there. Staud has suggested that cytokines probably play a major in CSS, but only within the central nervous system.

No Biomarker Yet – An immune signature that shows up only in the more severely ill gives us clues about the illness but obviously isn’t going to work as a biomarker.  But what would happen if Montoya essentially shoved those people into a more severe state by having them exercise? Would adding exercise to the mix make the more moderately ill patients look like more severely ill patients?

Montoya’s Exercise Study

Would exercise make moderately ill ME/CFS patients in the throes of post-exertional malaise look like severely ill patients? The answer to that question was no.

Montoya’s maximal exercise test produced opposite results from the cytokine study done in patients at rest.  This time, exercise reduced the levels of four cytokines (TNF-a, IL-8, CCL4, ICAM-1) while increasing the levels of only 1 (CXCL-10).

Both TNF-a and IL-8 increase during exercise in healthy people, however. The fact that both went down in ME/CFS patients may be notable.  If immune exhaustion is present then perhaps one might expect cytokine levels to drop when the body is faced with an exercise stressor.

A 2014 review of exercise studies reported that while exercise does appear to effect the complement system and gene expression and increase oxidative stress in ME/CFS, it does not appear to effect cytokines. Montoya’s results suggested the opposite.

Genomics Study Suggests Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is an Inflammatory Disorder

At the Stanford Symposium, Montoya announced that the gene expression results indicated that ME/CFS was similar to a disease called systemic inflammatory response syndrome or SIRS. He repeated that assertion again; this time stating that ME/CFS was a “100% match” to SIRS.  (The abstract was a bit more cautious, stating that the gene expression results were “very similar” to it and similar diseases).

SIRS

SIRS has been called a
“cytokine storm”

The concept of SIRS came out of ten years of work at a Toronto trauma lab by Dr. William Nelson. SIRS is  a kind of cytokine “storm” – a term sometimes used in ME/CFS – which refers to a positive feedback cycle that results in higher and higher levels of cytokines.  SIRS also effects both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels as well.

SIRS refers to a state of systemic inflammation after infection or some other insult and can result in organ dysfunction and failure. Intriguingly, given the Australian metabolomic group’s suggestion that the metabolomic results in ME/CFS are similar to sepsis, it’s closely related to sepsis.

SIRS has other manifestations that some may find familiar. Increased heart rates, lower or higher than normal body temperatures, rapid breathing rates, and low white blood cell counts found in SIRS have also been found in ME/CFS. The rapid breathing rates, by the way, are associated with either increased metabolic stress due to infection or inflammation or may signal inadequate perfusion because of the onset of anaerobic cellular metabolism.

Other possible links include fibrin deposition, platelet aggregation, and coagulopathies aka Dr. Berg’s findings in ME/CFS some years ago. Dr. Montoya’s immense gene expression study almost couldn’t have uncovered a more interesting disease to link to ME/CFS.  How serendipitous as well – if this all turns out – that Ron Davis and some members of his Open Medicine Foundation team have done an enormous amount of work on sepsis.

How is SIRS treated? In some ways (blood volume enhancement, anti-anaphylaxis drugs, selenium, glutamine, eicosapentaenoic acid, and antioxidants) that can be helpful in ME/CFS.

Epigenetic Modifications Point at Immune System and HPA Axis

Montoya’s epigenetic study suggested an infection (or some other insult) had indeed occurred in ME/CFS. Greatly increased rate of methylation in ME/CFS patients’ immune regulatory genes suggested some infection or other environmental insult had occurred.

Other epigenetic modifications were found to affect HPA axis genes.  Given the strong interaction between the HPA axis and the immune system, it wouldn’t be surprising at all to find that some event had tweaked both the HPA axis and immune genes in many ME/CFS patients. (The Montoya group is currently engaged in a promising HPA axis study.)

Other gene groups affected by methylation (epigenetic modification) include genes that play a role in, yes, metabolism.  One gene highlighted in a whole genome polymorphism study has been implicated in lactic acidosis (NUFS7). A polymorphism in this gene, which transfers electrons from NADH to CoQ10, could result in increased oxidative stress and reduced mitochondrial output.

Is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome an Inflammatory Disease?

Finding increased immune activation in severe ME/CFS patients, and with gene expression results a close match to SIRS, Montoya asserted that ME/CFS is an overactive immune disease and proposed that its new name should include the word “inflammatory.” Montoya results suggest this, but it’s hard to see how any consensus can be reached until we get more consistent results from the cytokine studies (???).

Pathogens

When asked about retroviruses, Montoya suggested there was no cheese down that tunnel. In several of his newsletters Montoya promised “exciting” new findings regarding pathogens but none were presented at this conference.

Allergy Study Reveals Intriguing Subset

Dr. Levine’s allergy study was, for me, one of the surprise highlights of the conference. This nice big study demonstrated how valuable a resource the multi-site ME/CFS experts centers are, and how valuable a tightly integrated network of research centers will be.

In one of the bigger ME/CFS studies to date, Levine queried 200 patients in five sites regarding the incidence of allergic symptoms/conditions and found that the presence of sinusitis and hives distinguished ME/CFS patients from healthy controls.  (My guess is that the presence of sinusitis is overlooked and understudied in ME/CFS).

allergy subset ME/CFS

An allergy subset appears to have increased pain sensitization as well

The fact that having either of those conditions resulted in patients experiencing more pain suggested that an immune process was ramping up their pain levels.   That hypothesis was strengthened when Levine found that this group also had a much, much higher incidence of migraine, tension headaches, back pain, neck pain, and fibromyalgia.  Plus they had more gut and inflammatory symptoms. Something clearly appeared to be driving a pain sensitization process in these patients.

What is the tie that binds these findings together? Levine suggested it might be mast cell activation. Plus, Dr. Levine noted that both mast cells and neurons secrete two factors: nerve growth factor and substance P, known to increase pain. Then there’s tryptase to consider. A recent study suggested that modification of a tryptase gene could be behind some cases of EDS, POTS, IBS, ME/CFS and FM. Another suggested mast cell activation may be occurring in ME/CFS

This is the kind of study that makes you wonder why the heck it hasn’t been done before. The study was surely not expensive, yet it might illuminate much about ME/CFS.  It was funded by the Hitchens Foundation.

POSTER: RNase L Returns? Novel Isoform of Ribonuclease L Shows up in Fibromyalgia

The idea that an important immune enzyme called RNase L had been broken into pieces and was not only no longer working properly but was actually causing channelopathies and other issues raised a great deal of interest in ME/CFS the 2000’s. At some point work on the enzyme stopped but RNase L was not forgotten.

In a surprise a Spanish group looked for and found the broken-up bits of the enzyme in fibromyalgia. The results were too variable for the 37 dKA form of the enzyme to be considered a biomarker but they did suggest that a subset of FM patients carried it.

Even more surprising was their finding of another broken up bit of RNase L (70 kDa) which was almost totally associated with the FM patients (p<.0001). They’ve create custom-made antibody to identify it and will apparently keep working on it.

PATHOGENS

POSTER: EBV Rides Again

We’ve heard so much about EBV over the years that we forget what a special virus it is. It’s’ true that almost everyone has been infected with EBV, and most have no problem with it, but EBV is no walkover.

When one is exposed to EBV later in life, it causes infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever) and is associated with several forms of cancer (Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, gastric cancer, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, central nervous system lymphomas). Evidence suggests that EBV infections result in a higher risk of many autoimmune diseases including dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome, and multiple sclerosis. Lastly, while hardly mentioned in the medical world (ME/CFS is not even mentioned in the Wikipedia article) but foremost in ME/CFS patients minds, EBV is a well-known trigger of ME/CFS.

EBV must have a multitude of tricks up its sleeve to contribute to so many illnesses. The idea that it plays a major role in ME/CFS has risen and fallen over the years. Right now, that idea seems to be more in its descendant phase, but as Dr. Klimas’s study shows, it ain’t over until it’s over; EBV may still very much figure in this disease.

Micro RNA’s – small bits of RNA – regulate which genes get expressed. It turns out that EBV, tricky virus that it is, encodes viral miRNA’s of its own. (EBV was the first virus found able to do this. Given the immense amount of EBV research being done (over 25 studies published in November alone) that was perhaps no surprise.)

HHV-6

HHV-6 appears to contribute to symptoms in ME/CFS

Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from ME/CFS patients and healthy controls before, during and after exercise, and various tests were done to assess EBV miRNA’s.  Preliminary results suggested that ME/CFS patients’ cells express higher levels of EBV proteins than normal and thus might be more likely to support EBV reactivation.

Plus some strange features emerged. The immune cells in ME/CFS tended to be smaller and have less volume (Ron Davis has found something similar). Instead of forming a classic “pump” shape the ME/CFS nuclei take on a puckered and wrinkled look as if they were aged. Plus, when a key immune transcription factor called STAT I gets activated, presumably by the virus, it ends up in the wrong part of the cell – a pattern indicative of viral reactivation.

All of this suggests that EBV may be tweaking ME/CFS cells in strange ways and that the virus may still play a part in ME/CFS.

POSTER: A Better HHV-6 Test

It’s clear that herpesvirus tests leave something to be desired and Nancy Klimas’ group is attempting to find a way to improve the diagnostic effectiveness of the Elisa test. The current test are provide only  yes-infected or no-not infected answers and are particularly unreliable at the high and low ends of the spectrum.

This study, involving Dr. Govindan from Tufts University and four Florida researchers, used various statistical tests to see if they could develop a truly “quantitative” Elisa for HHV-6.

The intercept they developed allowed them to accurately stratify patients, and showed that the HHV-6 intercept they produced was negatively associated with physical functioning; i.e. the higher the intercept – the worse the ME/CFS patients physical functioning was. This suggested that a) HHV-6 does contribute to the symptom burden in ME/CFS, and b) that this new test could aid doctors in determining when to apply antiviral therapies.

POSTER: Enterovirus Brain Infection Found

Dr. Chia’s work to get the medical world to take enterovirus infections in ME/CFS seriously continues. He gave a workshop on enteroviruses and seemed to be in demand; every time I saw him he was engaged in conversation with a group of people.

His poster highlighted the possible effects of enteroviruses in the most dramatic way. It told the story of a young man who first developed gut problems and then severe ME/CFS. Tests for herpesviruses were normal, but his Echovirus antibody levels were sky-high.  Stomach and colon biopsies stained positive for enteroviruses but enterovirus RNA was not detected in his blood (it often isn’t).

Unfortunately, the young man failed to respond to either alpha or gamma interferon or to SSRI’s, benzodiazepines or acid suppressants. Repeated MRI’s of his brain and spinal chord were normal. Six years into his illness, at the age of 29, he committed suicide.

His ending was tragic, but his story was not over. His harvested brain provided clues as to what may have happened. Neither a brain culture nor an RT-PCR picked up signs of enterovirus, but a western blot found protein bands which were similar to those found in the young man’s stomach biopsies (but different from those found in tuberculosis and lymphoma).

Dr. Chia concluded that this finding replicated a similar finding dating back to 1994.  He concluded that the

“finding of viral protein and RNA in the brain specimens ….is consistent with a chronic, persistent infection of the brain causing debilitating symptoms. EV is clearly one of the causes of ME/CFS, and antiviral therapy should be developed for chronic EV infection.”

Like herpesviruses, most enteroviral infections are passed off quickly, but like herpesviruses, enteroviruses are also associated with serious disorders including polio, meningitis, myocarditis, hand, foot and mouth disease and others. According to Wikipedia, treatment for enterovirus infections is primitive, consisting mostly of relieving symptoms such as pain as they occur.

One hopes at some point an independent lab will take up Dr. Chia’s work and give it the replication it needs and he deserves.

Conclusions

The cytokine findings are disappointingly inconsistent, but the immune system is a vast place and gene expression, epigenetic modeling and other studies continue to point a finger at it.  The Montoya studies should tell us much, plus the entry of noted researchers such as Ian Lipkin and Mady Hornig,  Maureen Hanson, Derya Unutmaz, Michael Houghton and Patrick McGowan into the field ensure that we’ll be learning much more about the immune system in the years ahead.

Marshall-Gradisnik’s NCNED team is churning out immune studies at a rapid rate, Broderick’s early modeling  studies suggest an immune focused 1-2 punch may knock out post-exertional malaise, and Fluge and Mella are testing another autoimmune drug, cyclophosphamide, in clinical trials.

Both Fluge/Ron Davis believe an immune process may be targeting energy production in our cells, the same may be true for ion channels, and it’s now clear that an autoimmune process is producing POTS in some patients. Every microbiome study thus far suggests altered microbial diversity and/or gut leakage into the blood could be sparking an immune response.

The Simmaron Foundation’s expanded spinal fluid study should give us a better handle on what’s happening in the brain just as new techniques to measure the amount of neuroinflammation present in the brain come online.

Finally, it’s encouraging that researchers are getting serious about subsets – and finding them when they look for them.

Major Findings

  • Increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with increased severity in ME/CFS;
  • Exercise, on the other hand, appears to down-regulate cytokine levels in ME/CFS including several cytokines that are typically increased during exercise in healthy people;
  • Gene expression results suggest ME/CFS is very similar to a sepsis-like condition called systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) which shares some other characteristics with ME/CFS;
  • Epigenetic modifications suggest that events may have altered the expression of genes involved in both the HPA axis and immune systems in ME/CFS;
  • One subset of ME/CFS with sinusitis and/or hives also falls prey to other pain sensitization type disorders such as migraine, fibromyalgia, headache and back pain. Mast cells could be implicated;
  • A broken up form of RNase L, an important enzyme involved in fighting pathogens, showed up in fibromyalgia;
  • Higher levels of EBV proteins in ME/CFS patients’ cells plus structural abnormalities in their cells suggest EBV reactivation may occur more frequently in ME/CFS;
  • A quantitative Elisa test suggests that HHV-6 contributes to the symptoms of ME/CFS as well;
  • Enteroviral proteins in the brain of a young man with ME/CFS who committed suicide suggested that enteroviruses have infected the brains of some people with ME/CFS.

SR_Donate_6.9.14_1

 

 

The Epstein-Barr Virus, Magnesium and ME/CFS Connection (?)

August 22, 2015

Magnesium may be the most commonly used supplement in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.  Some people think a smoldering Epstein-Barr Virus infection may be common in ME/CFS.  In something of a shocker, recent research into EBV and magnesium suggests that low magnesium and EBV infections may sometimes go hand in hand.

Mg2+ Regulates Cytotoxic Functions of NK and CD8 T Cells in Chronic EBV Infection Through NKG2D. Benjamin Chaigne-Delalande,1* Feng-Yen Li,1,2* Geraldine M. O’Connor,3 Marshall J. Lukacs,1 Ping Jiang,1 Lixin Zheng,1 Amber Shatzer,4 Matthew Biancalana,1 Stefania Pittaluga, et. al, Michael J. Lenardo1† 12 JULY 2013 VOL 341 SCIENCE

The authors had recently characterized a primary immunodeficiency disease in people with chronic Epstein-Barr virus infection called XMEN.

XMEN disease

XMEN is a rare genetic disease that combines low magnesium levels and Epstein-Barr virus infection. Could it help explain ME/CFS?

XMEN disease is a rare genetic disease mostly appearing in men that is caused by mutations in the MAGTI magnesium transporter gene. People with XMEN disease suffer from increased infections including upper respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media, viral pneumonia, diarrhea, epiglottitis, and pertussis.

They also typically have high levels of Epstein-Barr virus infection and are at increased risk of coming down with EBV associated lymphoma.

The link to lymphoma and the recurrent infections were explained when they discovered that increased magnesium levels are required for natural killer (NK) and T-cell activation.

XMEN disease is not chronic  fatigue syndrome and vice versa, but the two diseases may share four intriguing  factors: EBV reactivation, poorly functioning NK and T-cells, the need for magnesium supplementation and possibly increased risk of lymphoma.

The Magnesium – Immune System Connection

The vast majority (95%) of the magnesium in our body is bound in our cells but it’s the 5% that’s unbound that makes the difference in our immune response.  The XMEN patients studied – some of whom had developed lymphoma – had normal levels of bound magnesium in their cells but reduced levels of unbound magnesium.

Interestingly, all experienced repeated minor viral infections and had elevated levels of active EBV in their blood.  Tests indicated that their immune systems knew the virus was there – it was producing normal levels of the  EBV specific memory T-cells – but their NK and cytotoxic T-cells – the cells tasked with killing EBV – were having trouble killing it.

The question was why. First they looked at the receptors on the NK and T-cells that activate them in the presence of EBV infected cells.   If the receptors are not present or are damaged the cells are effectively blind to EBV.

They  found reduced levels of the NKG2D receptors needed to turn NK and T cells into killing machines. They knew the genetics of the XMEN patients prevented them from taking up magnesium properly.  When they pumped their NK and T-cells full of magnesium (by culturing them in magnesium sulfate) the NKG2D receptors started working again. The cytotoxic T cell killing  problem was partially resolved and the NK cell killing problem was fully resolved.

magnesium

Low levels of free magnesium turned off NK and T-cells – and allowed EBV to take up residence in the cell.

They also found, importantly, that reducing magnesium levels abolishes NKG2D activation in normal T-cells; i.e. proper magnesium levels are needed for T-cell functioning. (Other receptors on NK and T-cells were not affected by magnesium levels – only these specific receptors.)

Next the researchers tested their hypothesis on humans. Upon being provided oral magnesium gluconate small but significant increases in free magnesium and a “modest restoration” in NKG2D levels were seen in an XMEN patient. A decline in the number of his B-cells harboring EBV suggested that his NK and perhaps T-cells were, indeed, more effectively targeting EBV infected  B-cells.

When the patient went off the magnesium supplementation the situation reversed itself.

Further testing indicated that infusions of magnesium sulfate and oral supplementation of magnesium threonate were more effective.

This was an early study (which did make it into Science) but it suggests that something as simple as magnesium supplementation may reduce the rate of infections and possibly the risk of lymphoma in XMEN patients.

EBV infections don’t necessarily lead to or are even associated with these problems: only one type of EBV patient was shown to have them in this study.  People with chronic active EBV infections (CAEBV) or something called X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) did not have reduced basal free levels of Mg2+ or problems with magnesium transport.

The ME/CFS Connection (???)

ME/CFS and FM  are not XMEN disease. They’re not rare and active EBV is not commonly found. Nor does magnesium supplementation, as common as it is, lead to a cure as it might for XMEN disease.

Because neither the MAGTI transporters or the NKG2D receptors found to play a role in XMEN disease have been assessed in ME/CFS, we have no idea if these transporters are functioning correctly in ME/CFS or FM.

Several features in ME/CFS and XMEN disease overlap...

Several features in ME/CFS and XMEN disease overlap…

Research into rare, genetic diseases, however, often gives us insight into more common disorders. That could be the case with ME/CFS.

EBV triggered infectious mononucleosis, after all is common in ME/CFS, natural killer and T-cells are dysfunctional, magnesium supplementation is rampant, and some ME/CFS patients do very well on antivirals targeting EBV. Recurrent (upper respiratory) infections can be found in some ME/CFS patients as well and increased rates of lymphoma have been found in early studies. (Could the increased rates of lymphoma found ME/CFS due to undiagnosed XMEN disease?).  Some researchers and doctors believe a special kind of EBV reactivation often occurs in ME/CFS.

Further studies in this area could impact ME/CFS or FM in several ways. They could elucidate problems with magnesium transportation and they could uncover other ways to fight EBV.

Indeed, the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID believes that further research into magnesium associated EBV reactivation could help patients with chronic EBV disorders.

Because chronic EBV infections afflict patients of other disorders, this information may be useful for designing general therapies against EBV. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disorders

Whether or not  ME/CFS falls into chronic EBV infected group largely depends on who you’re talking to.  An EBV ME/CFS researcher was, however, recently given a major NIH grant to study EBV infection and the Simmaron Research Foundation is engaged in similar research (see below).

The Future

We are going to learn a lot more how about how magnesium is transported into and out of cells, though.  Lenardo and Chaigne-Delalande are currently examining how other magnesium transporters work.  That’s good news for diseases like ME/CFS and fibromyalgia in which magnesium supplementation is common. They’ll also continue to examine magnesium’s role in chronic EBV infection.

(One question not examined in the study was whether EBV be somehow damaging magnesium transporters in order to turn off NK and T cell activity…)

More Epstein-Barr Virus News

The smoldering EBV infection hypothesis for ME/CFS recently got a boost when Ohio State University professor Dr. Vance Williams got a major NIH grant to study it. Williams earlier studies indicated that unusual EBV proteins rarely seen in humans can produce many of the symptoms found ME/CFS. Williams multi-year, multi-million dollar NIH study will further investigate the effects these proteins are having in this disease.

Simmaron Research | Give | Donate | Scientifically Redefining ME/CFS The Simmaron Research Foundation‘s NIH study examining the extent of autoimmunity and non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in people with ME/CFS and their family members will focus on similar ground. This study will determine whether antibodies to the same EBV proteins Williams uncovered in ME/CFS are present. Finding antibodies to these unusual proteins would a) implicate EBV as a key player in ME/CFS and b) strongly suggest ME/CFS is an autoimmune disorder.

Please support the Simmaron Research Foundation as it scientifically redefines how ME/CFS is understood and treated.

Novel Approach to Herpesvirus Infections Could Reap Dividends for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

Liang Y, Vogel JL, Arbuckle JH, Rai G, Jadhav A, Simeonov A, Maloney DJ, Kristie TM. Targeting the JMJD2 Histone Demethylases to Epigenetically Control Herpesvirus Infection and Reactivation from Latency. Sci Transl Med. 2013 Jan 9. PMID: 23303604.

Common Infections..Sometimes Uncommon Effects

An uncommon common virus

Unlike most viruses once you’re infected with herpesviruses you’re usually infected for life.

Herpesviruses are fundamentally different from most other viruses we come into contact with.  Most viruses  get completely eliminated from our systems  but herpesviruses have found a way to stick around – usually effectively bottled up by our immune system – for a lifetime ride in our cells. Very common in humans, we’ve all been exposed to and almost all of us carry a  latent or inactive herpesvirus infection.

Usually contracted in childhood most herpesvirus infections produce nothing more troubling than a childhood cold but they have a dark side.   A Epstein Barr virus infection that causes a mild cold in childhood often produces  infectious mononucleosis in adolescents and increase one’s risk of later coming down with multiple sclerosis and ME/CFS.  A mild herpes simplex infection during childhood can turn into an  painful case of shingles when we’re older.

Herpesvirus infections may be ubiquitous and usually mild but they  can cause encephalitis, blindness, horrific neurological problems and inflammation if they hit the right person at the wrong time. Not surprisingly, people with impaired immune systems such transplant patients are at high risk of herpesvirus reactivation with sometimes deadly consequences.

Key Viruses in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

herpesvirus

A significant percentage of people may have reactivated herpesvirus infection.

Herpesviruses may play a key role in ME/CFS as well. How many people with chronic fatigue syndrome have a reactivated form of the virus is still unclear but some doctors believe the percentage is substantial. Many people begin their experience with chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) with a herpesvirus infection in the form of infectious mononucleosis.

Dr. Lerner and Dr. Glaser believe an unusual form of Epstein-Barr  virus is wreaking havoc in many patients. Their model suggests proteins and enzymes produced by a  partial reactivation of the virus are sending  the immune system into a tizzy and causing fatigue and other symptoms. Because the current slate of  herpesvirus antivirals attack the virus in the later stages of it’s development they’re in effect missing the action in ME/CFS.  These drugs work to some degree.  As they slowly lower viral load, the cells harboring the viruses die off over time.

Help Needed 

“there remains a clear need to develop new antivirals”

The problem is that in this model  the road to recovery takes time and lots of it; often a year or more of taking expensive antivirals. Dr. Lerner’s  been looking for a treatment that will hit the virus just as it’s starting to replicate and he’s  not alone. Even when the full virus is present, the present slate of  antivirals still sometimes  arrive too late to prevent blindness, neurological problems, birth defects and inflammation. The current herpesvirus antivirals come too late to the scene to

  1.  block the production of mutant viruses that can give rise to resistant strains of virus
  2.  block the expression of early viral enzymes that effect  and can produce cancer in cells
  3.  block the product of viral proteins that can trigger a damaging immune response (Lerner/Glaser’s theory of ME/CFS)

A Possible Breakthrough

A new approach to treating herpesvirus infections could reap dividend for other viral infections as well. An entirely different way of treating herpesvirus infections could reap dividend for other viral infections as well.

A new approach to attacking hard to treat herpesvirus infections could reap dividend for other viral infections as well.

“Depletion of the JMJD2 members or inhibition of their activity with a new drug results in repression of expression of viral immediate early genes and abrogation of infection. This inhibitor also represses the reactivation of HSV from the latent state in sensory neurons”

That may be changing. Researchers working at National Chemical Genomic Center (NCGC) have a developed  a ‘probe’ that stops herpesviruses from replicating by  pouncing  on the early enzymes they use to build a new virus.   (Ironically the virus uses our genetic machinery to get our bodies to produce the enzymes to build another virus). These researchers were able to design this probe after they figured out what genes these herpesviruses activate early in their life cycle.  This ‘epigenetic’ approach – stopping a virus by targeting the genes it needs to replicate – may very well herald a new era in antiviral therapy.

It’s  death by small cuts. By continually stopping the virus from replicating the herpesvirus will eventually  die when the cell they’re  living in dies. The good news for ME/CFS patients is that this probe could also whack the very enzymes Lerner and Glaser believe are causing ME/CFS. That could  mean no more long, expensive and sometimes dangerous treatment regimens.

The Implications for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

This study focused on two herpesvirus infections (cytomegalovirus (HCMV), herpes simplex) sometimes found in ME/CFS. In Dr. Peterson’s presentation in Paris on the successful treatment of HCMV infections in ME/CFS, he reported that a small subset of ME/CFS patients have an active herpes simplex infection, as did Dr. Montoya at the FDA Drug Development Workshop.

Epstein-Barr Virus and Human Herpesvirus 6?

 Continued elucidation of the mechanisms and components involved in epigenetic regulation of viral pathogens will lead to additional targets for antiviral development

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) are the pathogens most commonly associated with ME/CFS, however. I was unable to determine if the  enzyme targeted by this probe is found in these viruses. The fact that the  herpesvirus family undergoes a process called chromatic assembly and modulation in which the enzyme plays a role  suggests the probe might be effective in other herpesviruses.The fact that the probe worked in both alpha and beta herpesviruses (EBYis a gamma herpesvirus) suggests it may have widespread application but we’ll have to see if it applies to these viruses as well.

Dr. Martin Lerner, a specialist in treating herpesvirus infections in chronic fatigue syndrome has high hope for this approach.

My own research suggest immediate early gene products initiate CFS.  I think this work has great promise in effectively inhibiting many herpesviruses. Dr. Martin Lerner

Even if it doesn’t this discovery provides a new approach to drug treatment  that could be duplicated in other herpesviruses. Indeed these researchers are already looking for other epigenetic targets, one of which is found in Epstein-Barr virus.

This ‘probe’ has still  long way to get to the marketplace. It’s demonstrated its effectiveness in cultured cells and now needs to be assessed in animal models and  humans.

outside the box

This same epigenetic approaches that are effective in cancer are effective with viruses as well.

A New Paradigm for Antiviral Drug Development

There is intensive focus on the development of inhibitors of epigenetic components for the treatment of cancers and other diseases. The study presented here demonstrates that epigenetic inhibitors can also function as antiviral therapeutic agents.

The success of a drug employing a epigenetic approach to infection was big news with the study appearing in the premier scientific journal Science and the authors urging other researchers to pour resources into developing more epigenetic tools to fight infection.