All posts tagged herpesviruses

Even “Minor” Infections Can Cause Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

Giardia hasn’t historically ranked high as a potential cause of chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Some anecdotal reports suggest that a Giardia outbreak may have occurred prior to the Incline Village ME/CFS outbreak in the 1980’s. More recently, Corinne Blandino’s severe, decades long case of ME/CFS – which originated with an exposure to Giardia at work – demonstrated how devastating a case of Giardia triggered ME/CFS can be.

Giardia long lasting effects

Giardia is thought of as a minor infection – but it can have long lasting effects.

It wasn’t until city in Norway got exposed to Giardia in 2004, however, that Giardia, a protozoa, became one of the pathogens definitively linked with chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Large studies (n=1254) examining the aftermath of the outbreak in a public water system in Bergen found that five years later, almost 50% of those originally infected still had symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and/or chronic fatigue (post-infectious chronic fatigue).

“Other patients suffer a severe, long lasting illness, for which treatment is ineffectual, and even after the parasite has finally been eliminated, some sequelae persist, affecting quality of life and continuing to cause the patient discomfort or pain” (LJ Robertson et al, 2010)

Five percent suffered from fatigue severe enough for them to lose employment or be unable to continue their education. Interestingly, all had taken anti-parasitic drugs and all had apparently cleared the pathogen from their systems.  Five years later, 30% were deemed to have an ME/CFS-like illness and almost 40% had irritable bowel syndrome  (IBS).

“Minor” Infection – Sometimes Serious Results

By all accounts Giardia shouldn’t be doing this. Giardia is not normally considered a serious infection. Most people have some diarrhea and pass the bug quickly – and if they don’t, antibiotics are usually (but not always) effective. Giardia, seemingly, produces the kind of “minor” infection that our medical system doesn’t spend much time on.

The Mayo Clinic reports that Giardia infection (giardiasis) is one of the most common causes of waterborne illness in the United States. The parasites are found in backcountry streams and lakes throughout the U.S., but can also be found in municipal water supplies, swimming pools, whirlpool spas and wells. Giardia infection can be transmitted through food and person-to-person contact.

Research studies are slowly revealing that the effects of even vanquished Giardia infections can be long lasting for some. The Mayo Clinic reports that intestinal problems such as lactose intolerance  may be present long after the parasites are gone. (Even though half a dozen studies have been published on the Bergen outbreak, Mayo fails to note that long term issues with fatigue and pain (or ME/CFS) may result).

The Bergen studies indicate, however, that this rather common infection worldwide can cause long term and even at times debilitating fatigue as well. The takeaway lesson from the Bergen studies is that one doesn’t need to have mono, Ross-River virus or Valley fever or any of several serious infections to get seriously afflicted. As Dr. Chia has been saying about enteroviruses for years, any minor infection has the potential to cause ME/CFS in the right person.

The Galland-Giardia Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Connection

The Norwegians wrongly reported that they were the first to associate fatigue with Giardia infections, but they couldn’t be blamed for thinking so. Way back in 1989, an integrative doctor named Dr. Galland suggested that Giardia infections were associated with ME/CFS. That year, Galland reported at a scientific conference that Giardia might be more common in ME/CFS than expected. Using a new test, Galland found active Giardia infection in 46 per cent of his chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) patients. (Galland noted that many of his patients may have picked up the bug during travel to foreign countries).

In 1990 Galland published a paper “Giardia lamblia infection as a cause of chronic fatigue.” in the Journal of Nutritional Medicine. (The paper never appeared on PubMed, the main English research database, apparently because of the journal it was published in. Citations from present and past journals devoted to ME/CFS have never appeared in PubMed either.)

chronic fatigue - giardia

Galland found the most devastating long term symptom after a Giardi infection was not gut pain but fatigue

Interestingly, given the involvement of a pathogenic gut protazoan, the patients’ gut symptoms were relatively minor; it was their fatigue, muscle pain, muscle weakness, flu-like feelings, sweats and enlarged lymph nodes that stood out. Galland reported that treating the infection alleviated the fatigue in over 80% of his patients and removed the digestive complaints in 90%. In 1998 Galland reported that one outbreak of Giardia, in Placerville, California, “was followed by an epidemic of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which swept through the town’s residents”.

Galland found that a longer than usual treatment regimen was often necessary to clear the body of the bug. Instead of the normal five-day treatment, his average treatment regimen lasted three weeks and could extend to eight.  He has also reported treatment successes involving other parasites (Entamoeba hystolytica, Cyrptosporidium) and other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

In 2011, Galland hadn’t let up on the ME/CFS/giardia/intestinal parasite angle, reporting that a woman with severe fatigue and dizziness (but not many gut symptoms) who had tested positive for Giardia slowly recovered under his anti-parasitic protocol. Citing a Johns Hopkins study indicating that 20 percent of healthy controls had antibodies to Giardia, Galland suggested that Giardia infections were much more common, particularly in small town water systems (such as Incline Village?), than previously suspected.

Giardia is probably not a common cause of ME/CFS: Dr. Peterson said he regularly tests for it but rarely finds it – but because it is usually treatable, it’s a test that probably everyone, particularly those who got ill after foreign travel, should get.

The biggest question for the ME/CFS community (and the Lyme community), though, is why, as with other infections, some people who get enough treatment to make the pathogen disappear are still ill.

Back to the Norwegians

Galland may have generated some buzz in integrative medicine circles, but it took the Norwegian researchers to get Giardia and ME/CFS on the map in the research world. Tests revealing increased numbers of cytotoxic (i.e. killer) T-cells indicated an immune system on the alert for a pathogen.  (Similar findings occur in herpesvirus and cytomegalovirus infections, infectious mononucleosis, etc.)

With the Norwegian studies indicating that depression and anxiety weren’t the culprits in the ME/CFS outbreak, several hypotheses popped up:

  • The Sneaky Pathogen theory – The pathogen wasn’t gone at all, it was laying low. Poor immune surveillance was allowing low, undetectable levels of the bug to produce low-grade inflammation that was causing fatigue, abdominal distress and other symptoms.
  • The Hit and Run Gut Attack Theory #1 – Before it was overcome, the water-borne pathogen permanently damaged the lining of the intestines causing problems with gut permeability, hypersensitivity, bacterial overgrowth, immune reactions (fatigue, etc.) and irritable bowel syndrome.
  • The Hit and Run Gut Attack Theory #2 – the pathogen triggered the activation of mast cells in the gut causing fatigue, hypersensitivity, IBS and other symptoms.

The Latest Study

Giardia-specific cellular immune responses in post-giardiasis chronic fatigue syndrome, Kurt Hanevik1, 2Email authorView ORCID ID profile, Einar Kristoffersen1, 3, Kristine Mørch1, 2, Kristin Paulsen Rye1, Steinar Sørnes1, Staffan Svärd4, Øystein Bruserud1 and Nina Langeland1, 2 BMC Immunology 201718:5 DOI: 10.1186/s12865-017-0190-3

The latest Norwegian study attempted to explain the lingering fatigue and other problems by testing immune responses (T-cell proliferation assay, T cell activation and cytokine release analysis) to Giardia in 20 Giardia exposed fatigued individuals, 10 Giardia exposed non-fatigued individuals and 10 healthy unexposed individuals were recruited as controls.

The study did not find increased immune responses to Giardia (including T-cell activation or cytokine responses) in the post-infectious Giardia group. The still ill Giardia patients did, however, have higher levels of a key immune marker called sCD40L implicated in inflammation and in severe symptom flares in ME/CFS patients after exercise.

giardia question chronic fatigue syndrome

No one knows why 5-10% of the post-giardiasis patients are still sick

Why these patients – five years after their Giardia infection was resolved – are still ill remains a mystery, but the link between Giardia infections and subsequent chronic illnesses is growing.  A higher incidence of Giardia infection was recently found in lupus. Just this year, a study found an association between Giardia infection and the subsequent development of arthritis.  A 4,000 person study recently confirmed an association between Giardia infection and the development of irritable bowel syndrome.  That study’s findings were buttressed by an earlier study indicating that Giardia induces gut hypersensitivity in rats long after the parasite had been cleared.

How Giardia is setting some people up for subsequent illnesses such as ME/CFS, arthritis, lupus or IBS isn’t entirely clear.  It is clear, though, that particularly virulent strains of Giardia that cause more damage might be involved.  Giardiasis can damage the microvilli of the intestines and promote inflammation. Eight months after the apparent resolution of Giardia, signs of gut inflammation were present in almost 50% of the Bergen cohort. (That high number suggested that the Bergen cohort may have been hit by a particularly virulent strain of Giardia.)  Protracted levels of gut inflammation resulting in systemic inflammation – as some suspect is present in ME/CFS – could explain the fatigue and other problems that remained.

“Host responses” may be important as well. Reduced levels of gut arginine at the time of infection may result in more gut damage. Although T-cells are the big guns in the immune response to pathogens, one study suggested that one’s gut microbiome makeup played a bigger factor in preventing/allowing a serious infection to occur.

Some findings in the Norwegian Giardia outbreak mirror others seen in post-infectious ME/CFS illness states. Greater illness severity, whether characterized by increased symptom severity, more time spent in bed and/or a more difficult time ridding the body of the infection have been found to predispose people with infectious mononucleosis or giardiasis to coming down with ME/CFS.  Being female is another risk factor.

Prior illnesses may make a difference as well. Prior gut symptoms increased the risk of fatigue, etc., after a giardia infection but, interestingly, not more gut problems. This indicated, as has been shown before, that a lack of gut symptoms does not necessarily rule out the gut as a central factor in disease.

The Post-Infectious Cohort

Whether the pathogen involved is Ross-River virus, Q-fever, Epstein-Barr Virus, Giardia or other gut pathogens such as Campylobacter, Salmonella, Shigella, Escherichia coli and Trichinella spiralis, a year or so later, from 5-10% of those afflicted are still ill. Infections, whether cleared or not, clearly can have long-term consequences.  The link between infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis is a classic example. Dozens of studies indicate that having infectious mononucleosis increases one’s risk of later coming down with multiple sclerosis.

The Simmaron Research Foundation is continuing its efforts to examine the role unusual infections may play in ME/CFS with its support of the Konnie Knox study examining the role that vector-borne (bird/insect borne) infections may play in ME/CFS.

 

Simmaron Foundation’s Immunology Workshop: the Forefront of Diagnosing and Treating ME/CFS

Simmaron’s Immunology Workshop on ME/CFS, Part I

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Immunologists came to the Simmaron Foundation’s Immunology Workshop to decide if immune tests should be standard practice in ME/CFS diagnosis and treatment

Immunologists came to the Simmaron Foundation’s Immunology Workshop to decide if immune tests should be standard practice in ME/CFS diagnosis and treatment.

Simmaron Research Foundation is focused on redefining ME/CFS scientifically. They produced the Immunology Workshop at the 2014 IACFS/ME Conference in order to get a consensus from immunologists and practitioners on whether immune testing should help guide diagnosis and treatment in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS). Immunologists were invited to give presentations and then queried regarding whether immune tests should be incorporated into diagnostic protocols for this disorder.  Dr. Unger, the head of the CDC’s CFS program, was invited to attend.

Overviews of  some of the presentations make up Pt I of the Immunology Workshop Overview.

(I used my notes from the Workshop to build the foundation for this blog and then expanded on many of the subjects presented; i.e. the blog reflects my interpretation of the presentations and what they mean; it may not in places reflect the presenters viewpoints.)

Troy Querec, Ph.D, CDC – Natural Killer Cell Testing 

The CDC ignored natural killer (NK) cell functioning in ME/CFS for many years, but they appear to be convinced now that it’s a key problem.

Natural killer cells are called ‘natural killers’ because they don’t need to be activated to kill cells that don’t have the right MHC markers on them. They are also the only immune cells that can recognize infected cells without antibodies and MHC markers being present.

medical tests

The NK cell function test that reveals how effective NK cells are at killing invaders is laborious, expensive and, according to an NSU presentation at the IACFS/ME conference, not suited to most labs.  (This isn’t the first immune test relevant to ME/CFS that has not been readily available. Most of the tests associated with the RNase L enzyme are still available only at one lab in country.)

Recognizing the need for your average doctor to have access to a less expensive test of NK cell functionality, the CDC is working on one. (They’re not the first. The Klimas/Fletcher group in Miami was reportedly working on one several years ago.)

They’re focusing on measuring how effective the receptors found on the surface of NK cells are at turning the cells on. Receptor deficiency could play a role in the poor NK cell functioning found in ME/CFS. To that end they’re developing CD 107 antibodies that attach to the receptors.

Because shipping has also been shown to reduce NK cell viability, they’re also proposing ways to optimize NK cell viability during the shipping process. This involves keeping cells in their natural habitat – the whole blood – and isolating PMBC’s first. They propose a pilot study to determine ways to optimize viability of NK cells during shipping.

Finding an easier and more effective way to measure NK cell functionality would go a long way to establishing NK cell dysfunction as a biomarker for ME/CFS.

Dr. Constance Knox – B-cells and Chronic  Fatigue Syndrome

“Lots of vacuums in this field” 

After noting how little we know about the role B-cells play in ME/CFS, Dr. Knox echoed Mady Hornig’s statements that there are “lots of vacuums in this field” and then went onto a short overview.

A cornerstone of our immune defense, B-cells directly ‘attack’ pathogens and trigger other parts of the immune system to respond.

B_cell_activation

B-cells could be a major contributor to ME/CFS but the role they play is largely a mystery

First, they are activated by antigens (proteins associated with pathogens) brought to them by macrophages and dendritic cells – two innate immune cells. B-cells then produce hordes of pathogen specific antibodies that search for the pathogen outside the cell and attach to it in order to prevent it from attacking our cells. They also take that antigen and present it to killer T-cell’s which then mount a pathogen specific defense which gets at pathogens located inside the cell.

Two recent findings have overturned medical dogma concerning B-cells.

Naturally Occurring Antibodies: At one time it was thought B-cells only produced antibodies that were directed at specific invaders, but it’s now clear that naturally occurring antibodies – which are not directed at specific pathogens – are present as well. These antibodies are derived from unusual sugar residues synthesized in the gut – an interesting finding given the emphasis both Dr. Hornig and Dr. Lipkin place on the gut in ME/CFS.

Regulatory B-Cells – Cells regulating the powerful T-cell response (T-regulatory cells) received most of the attention until regulatory B-cells were discovered. Regulatory B-cells make up only 0.5% of total B-cells but are powerful regulators of immune activation and inflammation. They induce two important anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-beta), which dampen the inflammation produced by the innate immune system.

b-cell signaling

Problems with B-cell signaling would pose problems for other parts of the immune system.

IL-10 restores Th1/Th2 balance (a problem in ME/CFS) and inhibits inflammatory cascades while TGF-B wipes out some types of T-cells, dampens the activity of cytotoxic T-cells, and takes other actions to reduce inflammation. These cells often get upregulated in states of chronic inflammation and elevated levels of both have been found in ME/CFS.  (They suggest the immune systems of ME/CFS patients are attempting to reign in inflammation.)

Research  is need to determine if either cell plays a role in ME/CFS, but several ongoing studies may give us clues regarding the role B-cells play. Rituxian (Rituximab) – an monoclonal antibody directed against mature or activated B-cells – reduces B-cell numbers. (A successful result in Rituximab trial could indicate B-cells in ME/CFS are triggering an autoimmune response or could implicate EBV infection.)

A 2011 study documenting increased rates of lymphoma in ME/CFS patients suggests more problems with B-cell regulation may  be present in a subset of  patients.

David Baewer, M.D., Ph.D – Serology and HHV-6 Infections

Most humans carry latent herpesviruses in their cells that do little harm. Once activated, though, in people with poorly functioning immune systems such as transplant patients, these seemingly innocuous viruses can cause enormous damage. With their immune systems intentionally knee-capped in order to avoid an immune attack on their transplanted organ, they are ripe for herpesvirus activation. Several antivirals under development that could assist some people with ME/CFS come from research devoted to preventing herpesvirus activation in transplant patients.

herpesvirus

Some researchers believe herpesvirus activation is common in ME/CFS -but that the typical virus tests are not up to the job.

Dr. Baewer proposed that the same  general processes causing herpesvirus reactivation in transplant victims is occurring in ME/CFS. Standard testing for herpesviruses, however, is unable to distinguish the kind of active herpesvirus infections he believes are present in ME/CFS.

He noted that primary active infections – which occur when the body is first introduced to a pathogen – are often diagnosed via a high IgM response.

The kind of herpesvirus infection suspected in ME/CFS, however, (and the kind that mostly occurs in adults) involves reactivation from a latent infection. Because these kinds of infections rarely generate a robust IgM response, Dr. Baewer asserted IgM readings in adults have little clinical value.

Viral DNA with PCR isn’t effective either because it only tells us if the virus is present and it is present in 95-100% of population.

Viral mRNA using reverse transcriptase PCR, on the other hand, shows whether the virus replicating or not.  This type of testing tells which genes in herpesvirus genome are present in the blood – and identifying which genes show up is the key to determining whether the virus is actively replicating or not.

Herpesviruses need to be able to attack and establish themselves in B-cells, ward off the immune system’s efforts to find them and then replicate when the time is right. They are complex viruses with big genomes that have genes associated with maintaining latency, with altering the immune response and with building new viruses. Viral mRNA using reverse transcriptase PCR can identify which stage the virus is  in.

gene

Tests can reveal which stage of its lifecycle EBV is in. Unfortunately, those tests are rarely done in ME/CFS patients

If there is evidence of genes associated with latency, but nothing is present, the virus is simply maintaining latent state. If genes produced later in its life cycle are found, the virus is active but not replicating. If genes devoted to building the outer membrane of the herpesvirus are present – you have an active, replicating virus on your hands.

(The fact that Epstein-Barr virus can hijack the nuclear machinery in B-cells and go through its early, medium and late cycles without ever replicating suggests it can cause much mischief simply sitting in B-cells.  We know that in order to maintain latency, EBV affects how B-cells, a critical part of the immune machinery, function.  We know EBV increases the lifespan of B-cells and that it prompts them to replicate. Some researchers believe EBV’s effects on B-cells underlie all autoimmune processes in the body. )

The smoldering herpesvirus infection hypothesis in ME/CFS produced by Dr. Lerner and researchers at Ohio State University proposes EBV is perturbing immune cells and causing immune cell dysfunction without causing cell death, while producing only very low levels of viral transcription.

Because herpesvirus serology tests will not pick up this type of infection, however, it will never be picked up by standard serology tests.

(to be continued…)___________________

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The Immunology Workshop – Redefining how ME/CFS is diagnosed and treated

Simmaron’s Immunology Workshop Participants

  • Daniel Peterson, M.D. Sierra Internal Medicine, Incline Village, NV
  • Nancy Klimas, M.D. Ph.D Nova South Eastern University, Miami, FL
  • Paula Waziry, Ph.D Nova South Eastern University, Miami, FL
  • Sonya Marshall, Ph.D Griffith University Gold Coast Australia
  • Sharni Hardcastle, Ph.D Griffith University Gold Coast Australia
  • Konstance Knox, Ph.D., Founder, CEO, Coppe Healthcare Solutions
  • David Baewer, M.D. Ph.DMedical Director, Coppe Healthcare Solutions
  • Isabel Barao, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor, University of Nevada, Reno, Simmaron Research Scientific Director
  • Gunnar Gottschalk, B.S., Simmaron Research, Incline Village, NV
  • Troy Querec, Ph.D., Associate Service Fellow, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
  • Dennis Mangan, Ph.D., Former Chair, Trans-NIH ME/CFS Research Working Group, Office of Research on Women’s Health, U.S. National Institutes of Health
  • Mary Ann Fletcher, Ph.D., University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Professor of Medicine, Microbiology/Immunology and Psychology
  • Elizabeth Unger, M.D. Ph.D., Chief, Chronic Viral Disease Branch, Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Michael VanElzakker Ph.d Talks – About the Vagus Nerve Infection Hypothesis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

 An Interview with Michael VanElzakker Ph.d

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Van Elzakker’s hypothesis could explain several of the mysteries associated with chronic fatigue syndrome

Michael VanElzakker’s Vagus Nerve Infection Hypothesis (VNIH) for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome may be the most intriguing hypothesis to come along in the last twenty years.  If it’s correct it could explain several mysteries including how a virus might trigger the disease and then seemingly disappear, why the Lipkin study failed to find an active infection, why cytokine studies have trouble finding evidence of the ‘never-ending cold’, why when antivirals work they often take so long to do so.

It’s raised a lot of interest. Now Michael VanElzakker ‘sits down’ and answers some questions about it.

Background

What is your background? When did you get interested in this subject and start  developing this hypothesis? 

I am a neuroscientist. I mostly focus on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which I consider to be very different from CFS and a separate arm of my research interests (although there are many interesting overlaps between the views of CFS and PTSD within our culture).

sick person

A sick friend prompted his interest in this disorder

However,  I got my bachelor’s and master’s at the University of Colorado – Boulder, at a time when the Psychology & Neuroscience department there was very focused on psychoneuroimmunology-related phenomena. Some of the many research programs there related to neuropathic pain, cytokines, and the vagus nerve. All it took was for someone who was thinking about CFS to be exposed to these different literatures and to start fitting them together.

I started thinking about CFS because I have a sick friend. She got sick back when CFS was viewed even more skeptically than it is today – I remember one MD referring to it as “yuppie flu.” I knew that my friend was not malingering – why would she be? She had to put her life on hold. It was pretty devastating.

The focus on the vagus nerve is simply because that organ is responsible for symptoms during “normal illness” that strongly overlap with CFS symptoms.

Testing the Theory

Apparently imaging techniques are not able yet to find localized infections in the vagus nerve. How far are they from being able to that? Is there interest in developing those kinds of techniques?

You reported that  PET scans have shown ‘promise’ in identifying activation of the microglia – a prominent part of your theory. (The VNIT proposes chronic microglial activation causes the vagus nerve to send signals to the brain that result in flu-like symptoms.)  It seems that we could settle the VNIH theory right now if PET scans showed clusters of infected areas around the vagus nerve. How effective are PET scans at doing something like this now?

I’ll answer these two questions together. As far as the effectiveness of PET scans finding local vagus infection: We don’t know. That’s part of what my group is trying to work on. There are a lot of technical problems that will require pilot testing.

PET Scan

Most PET scans are done of the brain. VE would like to do one further down in the vagus nerve area

One of the big problems is that PET scans cost thousands of dollars per hour. It’s difficult to convince funding agencies to give us money to pilot test a method so that we can even begin to ask questions about a hypothesis that may or may not be accurate. But I’ve got some really good people on my team and we’re working on it.

There’s interest because of this hypothesis, but most imaging of the vagus nerve thus far has been at the level of the brain, trying to understand the mechanism of vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy or depression. We’re trying to image it farther down.

If someone made an animal model of the hypothesis, that would help raise interest. I laid out a protocol in the paper for creating an animal model; I hope somebody with a rat lab takes the idea and runs with it. I’m not jealously guarding these ideas, I put them in the paper in the hopes that other groups would work on them too.

You suggested that future CFS research  use radiolabeled antibodies to localize clusters of specific virus types. This is done to find tumors. Is it possible to radiolabel antibodies so that they pick up clusters of infection in the body?

Yes, it is. But there are several problems to this with regards to the VNIH of CFS. One is that antibodies are specific, but CFS could be caused by a number of different pathogens. So, we could flood someone’s body with radiolabeled antibodies against HHV-6, but maybe in that specific case, their symptoms are caused by HHV-4 (Epstein–Barr).

Another problem is that some of the pathogens that might be most likely to cause CFS are found in the vast majority of humans. So, radiolableled antibodies against HHV-1 would find a signal in most people, but only cause CFS if the viruses are in a vagus (para)ganglion. And the vagus nerve is so highly branched, that could be all over the trunk. Another problem is that antibodies cannot always get inside ganglia, which are immunoprivileged. But despite all of that, I still think it’s a research program that is worth pursuing.

Treatment

Herpesviruses apparently love to set up house in the sensory ganglia, but you suggest that antiviral drugs might have trouble getting to them and destroying them there. Why is that?

drugs

Antivirals may take much longer to work in ME/CFS because they have difficulty accessing the vagus nerve where the viruses are present

Similarly to how the central nervous system has a blood-brain barrier (BBB), peripheral nervous system ganglia are immunoprivileged. According to the hypothesis, the frequent failure of drug therapy and also one’s own immune system to eliminate infections within vagal ganglia and paraganglia is just like how some drug doses and antibodies do not penetrate the BBB.

You noted that behavioral/stress management therapies such as CBT are moderately effective in about 30% of people with chronic fatigue syndrome, and that CBT resulted in lower viral loads and improved immune functioning in HIV. Why would this be?

Stress causes a cytokine response. So, if someone who doesn’t like public speaking is giving a presentation, their immune system is generating a cytokine response. If such a person even thinks about giving a presentation, they are likely to generate a cytokine response.

People with CFS have an authentic reason to be concerned about any activity that requires physical exertion, and it’s called post-exertional malaise: worsened symptoms after exertion.

According to the vagus nerve infection hypothesis (VNIH), there is a physiological reason behind post-exertional malaise: Exercise provokes muscle tissue to produce the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, which would then exacerbate the ongoing  local cytokine response within vagus nerve ganglia or paraganglia. That’s the hypothesized mechanism behind post-exertional malaise.

The CBT practitioners in the infamous PACE study were focused on avoidance/fear of activity because they began with the assumption that CFS is psychological. They think the fear of activity itself is the cause of CFS; I’d say that fear of activity is justified, but like all fear, it can become dysfunctional. For the vast majority of their patients, CBT did not help. The three out of ten that found some slight improvement may have used CBT to figure out exactly what level of activity they should be worried about. So, the moderate improvements they reported in a minority of patients were probably related to stress reduction.

In patients with HIV, reducing something like stress that taxes the immune system is bound to help a little bit.

I understand that this is a really charged topic among CFS advocates, and there is a lot of misinformation out there. Just to be clear, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) does not get at the root cause of CFS. CBT offers coping strategies and is not a cure. But I can’t think of a single medical condition that isn’t exacerbated by stress. CFS is no different. Having a chronic illness is stressful and it makes one’s life complicated and there’s a grieving process. CBT is for those parts of the illness. It’s intended to help people solve problems and to challenge dysfunctional patterns. If you’re seeing a CBT practitioner who views CFS as a psychologically-based illness and is approaching your CBT that way, fire them. Find someone else.

While CBT can help people with serious and chronic medical problems, it should be used as an adjunct and not a primary treatment. It would be crazy, for example, for a doctor to prescribe CBT instead of chemotherapy for cancer. But chemotherapy is a known, empirically tested treatment for cancer. CFS doesn’t have such a thing yet.

stress

Behavioral practices like CBT that reduce stress can be helpful in immune mediated diseases such as HIV and ME/CFS, but are adjunct, not primary therapies

Without a cure, the next best thing is to focus on quality of life. I am very much focused on finding an explanation for CFS, which would then lead to a cure. I have hypothesized that CFS is a neurological illness triggered by a foreign pathogen infecting the vagus nerve. But the fact is that stress has profound impact on immune system function. CBT for CFS patients can reduce stress, which is one mechanism of action to improve symptoms.

I should also say – CBT sometimes gets conflated with graded exercise therapy as well. Some studies have combined these two techniques but they are not the same thing. In the paper I gave an example of a treatment regimen that included graded exercise therapy.

Again, to be clear, if the VNIH is correct and some combination of glial inhibitor, antivirals and vagus nerve stimulation can be used to quell symptoms, then and only then does it make sense to begin graded exercise therapy. At that point, the root cause of CFS symptoms has been dealt with, and the next priority is to deal with muscle deconditioning which is not an insignificant factor in ongoing symptoms.

I absolutely do not condone forcing still-sick patients to exercise if it’s making their symptoms worse. This should be obvious.

Others

The heart rate variability evidence suggests the parasympathetic nervous system (vagus nerve) is under-activated in ME/CFS while the sympathetic nervous system is over-activated.  The SNS activation, in fact, may be due to the PNS’s inability to rein it in.  The increased heart rate at rest, for instance, could be due to be due to the inability of the vagus nerve to slow it down. In your theory, though,  the vagus nerve appears to be activated by the localized infection.  I’m a bit confused.

ANS

Is an infection contributing to the autonomic nervous system problems in ME/CFS?

This has to do with the fact that the vagus nerve is a mixed cranial nerve, meaning it has both sensory (afferent, or towards the brain) and motor (efferent, or away from the brain) divisions. Its parasympathetic influence over the body results from efferent activity; its function in detecting peripheral infection and triggering sickness behavior results from afferent activity.

However, terms like over-active and under-active are a bit too simplified – what matters is that the nerve is able to respond and signal appropriately, to be able to create a functional signal-to-noise ratio.

Researchers have been looking for cytokines in ME/CFS for decades. Sometimes they find them, sometimes they don’t. When they do find them sometimes research groups find similar cytokines and sometimes they don’t. The one constant is that they keep looking. You mentioned that lung infections are also not associated with increased cytokine levels in the blood.  Are there many other infections like this?

Well, to be more accurate, it’s not necessarily that lung infections won’t show a cytokine response in the blood. It’s more that we cannot be certain to find a cytokine response from a local infection – that is, any local infection. If a lung infection were severe enough, you might find cytokines in the blood. Cytokine studies are quite prone to false negatives, and it’s a mistake to infer from a negative cytokine blood test that there is no cytokine response happening anywhere in the body.

In studies that look for cytokines in blood, there are 3 relevant questions:

  1. Is there any cytokine response in the first place?
  2. Did that cytokine response diffuse into peripheral blood?
  3. Did the method of detection work?
IL-1B

VE notes the difficulties present in finding a cytokine response in an infectious disease

The question we’re interested in is #1, however it’s a big assumption that the answers to #2 and #3 are “yes” when we infer from a negative blood test that there is no cytokine response.

Those of us who think that CFS is not psychologically-based tend to think there’s an immune dysfunction of some sort. People have been looking for cytokines because they are an obvious potential link between the immune system and CFS symptoms, but a lot of studies have ignored how cytokines work.

If a research group is unfamiliar with the cytokine literature they may have also made some easy mistakes in the cytokine assay – the actual lab methods for looking for these proteins.

For example, cytokines are relatively labile, meaning unstable. If someone who didn’t know any better stored their blood samples in a refrigerator instead of a -80° freezer, you can bet they did not find cytokines. If blood samples went through freeze-thaw cycles, the cytokines will also start to denature (break down). There are definitely a lot of really good researchers who have looked into cytokines, but the literature can get muddied pretty easily by bad studies. And because the symptoms are systemic, most people have been thinking in systemic terms (i.e., not thinking about a localized infection causing CFS).

In general, I’m skeptical of any attempts to find a “cytokine profile” for CFS or any other infectious disease. That doesn’t mean it can’t be done, but it’s difficult. Cytokine responses are very complex, they interact with each other and they change in daily and hourly rhythms. You could study one individual and not find a “cytokine profile” unless you took several samples a day for many days.

Response to the Hypothesis and the Future

This is a really intriguing theory. Kristin Loomis of the HHV-6 Foundation was excited by it.  Have you gotten much response from it? 

I’ve actually been really pleasantly surprised by the response. I’ve had the idea for quite a long time, and spent a lot of time and effort trying to set up a collaboration with a rat lab, to create an animal model. To make a very long and frustrating story short, nothing worked out.

people networking

The response to VE’s hypothesis has been very positive; he is working on putting a study together to test his hypothesis

I’ve been telling anybody who would listed about the hypothesis. It’s not like doors were getting slammed in my face, but most people simply didn’t have a background in the different literatures that the hypothesis ties together.

It wasn’t until recently that I discovered this unique journal, Medical Hypotheses, so I made some time to write up the idea. It gave me a forum to really give people the background they needed to understand the idea, and allows people to check the citations themselves. Based on past experience, I thought I’d have to keep cold-calling researchers to push the hypothesis. But it really took off right away.

I put it up online for free, and it’s been downloaded over 1000 times there; I don’t know how many people have downloaded it from the publisher through a university or hospital subscription. I’ve heard from researchers from 5 continents. Somebody translated the paper into Dutch and put it up online.

The week the paper came out, Anthony Komaroff contacted me, we’ve been in contact since. He finds the hypothesis to be “provocative and plausible” and shares my hope that functional imaging can help to shed some light on it. I’ve been in contact with a lot of other well-known CFS researchers, and I think the idea is at least changing the way that some people think about the problem.

VanElzakker

Van Elzakker will be at the IACFSME conference with a poster presentation of his hypothesis

I also know that the paper is already being taught at some universities and medical schools, so hopefully it will at least get young scientists to start thinking about CFS. I hope people start to think about new CFS findings through the lens of this hypothesis because in my experience, it explains a lot of phenomenology.

Even if the hypothesis doesn’t turn out to be accurate, or is only partially accurate, I hope that it gets us closer to effective treatments that are actually attacking the root causes of CFS symptoms and not just helping people cope with them.

Some reports suggest you’re engaged in a pilot study. Can you comment on that?

On the record, I’d just say that I’ve put together a really great team to pursue the VNIH and that Dr. Komaroff is part of it. There are a lot of technical issues but we’re hoping to use functional imaging to gain enough preliminary data that we can pursue it further.

 

 

One Theory To Explain Them All? The Vagus Nerve Infection Hypothesis for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Big Theory

It could explain the Chronic Fatigue Initiatives pathogen study results.  It could show how an infection could cause chronic fatigue syndrome, and then seemingly disappear.  It integrates two of the biggest players in ME/CFS; the autonomic nervous system and the immune system. It focuses on the herpesviruses. It includes sensory nerves, an increasingly hot topic in ME/CFS/FM, and it follows an  established model of fibromyalgia.

light bult

If it’s correct VanElzakker’s hypothesis could explain a lot about chronic fatigue syndrome

It’s the Vagus Nerve Infection Hypothesis (VNIH) for chronic fatigue syndrome, and it could change how this disorder is viewed, researched and treated.

Created by Michael VanElzakker, a Tufts neuroscientist,  the VNIH proposes that nerve loving viruses trigger a difficult to detect  immune response which produces the fatigue and other symptoms present in chronic fatigue syndrome.

Location, Location, Location

VanElzakker proposes that an infection triggers ME/CFS, but if his theory is right the most important thing about that infection is not what it is but where it is.   That ‘where’  is the biggest nerve in the body; the vagus nerve – a ‘wandering nerve’ that stretches over much of our torso and sends its roots into most of the organs of the body.

The vagus nerve isn’t just any nerve; it’s the nervous system’s immune conduit to the brain. VE believes that an infection there doesn’t need to be large to cause havoc in the brain; it just needs to be present.

In some ways, vagus nerve appears, in fact, to be ripe for infection in ME/CFS. As it ‘wanders’ through the body it comes into contact with virus havens such as the esophagus, stomach, lungs and spleen, all of which have likely at one time or another harbored the herpesviruses (HHV6, HHV-5 [cytomegalovirus], HHV-4 [Epstein-Barr virus]) that have been thought to be associated with ME/CFS for decades.

Most humans carry several of these herpesviruses in latent form unless some stressor or biological event allows them to become reactivated.

virus

Van Elzakker suggests ME/CFS is caused by localized infections associated with the vagus nerve

VanElzakker believes that upon reactivation these viruses replicate and move outside the nerves where they run into glial cells that attempt to gobble them up.  The glial cells perk up remarkably in the presence of viruses, releasing all manner of pro-inflammatory and neuroexcitatory compounds (proinflammatory cytokines [IL-1B, IL-6, TNF-a], glutamate, prostaglandins, nitric oxide and free radicals. )

Receptors on the vagus nerve that sniff out these alarm signals tell the brain an infection is present, which then shuts the body down by sending out  signals  (fatigue, flu-like symptoms, pain, etc.) that slow the body down, tell it to stop moving, stop eating, stop thinking.

Because these infections are localized right on the main immune conduit to the brain, VanElzakker believes they don’t need to produce the outsized cytokine response researchers have been looking for.   All they need to do is tweak the vagus nerve and let it and the brain the do the rest.

You don’t need a ‘big’ infection to produce ME/CFS; all you need is a little infection  in the right place.

The Key Component – Glial Cells

The glial cells that surround and protect the vagus nerve are the key. Once thought to be mere structural scaffolding for the nerves, these cells  (e.g., astrocytes) are  now known to regulate nervous system signaling, a fact that’s been borne out in chronic fatigue syndrome’s sister disease,  fibromyalgia.

Immune system

VE believes pathogen triggered,but localized immune system activation around the vagus nerves may be causing ME/CFS

Glial cell  release of cytokines, glutamate, free radicals, etc.  in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord causes  increased pain sensitivity and allodynia in susceptible individuals. At some point the constant production of these excitatory substances  causes  a switch to get flipped sending the pain response spiraling upwards instead of shutting down.

At its most extreme (allodynia), the nervous system can interpret even the slightest touch as eliciting pain.   The pain response  system at this point, as VanElzakker, puts it,  has become, ‘pathological’.

That model of pain production has been solidly documented. VanElzakker proposes the same process  causing pain sensitization in the dorsal horn is  causing fatigue and other symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome, except this time it’s associated with glial cells surrounding the vagus nerve.

A New Model of Fatigue

There is no  reason to suspect  that vagus-nerve associated glia would function any different than pain associated glia. VanElzakker

Nobody knows what a herpesvirus infection  of the vagus nerve would look like,  but VanElzakker doesn’t see any  reason it should look any different  from an infection in other parts of the body.

shingles

Herpesvirus infections of the trigeminal nerve cause shingles. Do herpesvirus infections of the vagus nerve cause chronic fatigue syndrome?

We know a  herpesvirus infection of your trigeminal nerve gets you shingles and chronic pain.  Researchers believe a chronic infection in the dorsal horn of your spinal cord will can  get you fibromyalgia and allodynia.  Would  an  infection of the vagus nerve get you sickness behavior and  chronic fatigue syndrome?

There’s a good chance it might.  Animal studies indicate that fatigue/flu-like symptoms go gangbusters when the vagus nerve gets infected. In fact, it’s  possible  the flu-like symptoms associated  with infections wouldn’t even exist without the vagus nerve.  Rodents with their vagus nerves cut don’t act sick even after they’ve been infected with a pathogen; the fevers, fatigue, the desire for isolation – are gone.

What if the vagus nerve receptors were…ceaselessly bombarded with these cytokines?  The symptoms of sickness behavior would be severe and intractable.

If the glial cells surrounding the vagus nerve function the same way they do in the dorsal horn, a lingering or even a ‘smoldering’ infection (aka Dr. Lerner’s theory), could trigger the similar type of hypersensitive reaction in the vagus nerve. In this ‘immune sensitization’ model, it takes only very small amounts of cytokines to trigger fatigue and flu-like behavior.

In fact, VanElzakker suggests chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia could both be ‘glial cell diseases’.

How to Have an Infection That Doesn’t Show Up in the Blood

“Cytokines Responding to a Local Infection Stay Local” VanElzakker

If VanElzakker is right, the  same group of viruses are wreaking  havoc in different locations in different ME/CFS patients.  The problem is it’s just darn hard to get at them.  You can’t find them in the blood and you sure as heck can’t biopsy the vagus nerve.

A series of fascinating studies exploring how central nervous system infections cause chronic nerve pain may, however, illuminate what’s happening in ME/CFS.  First, researchers mimicked a localized nervous system infection by dropping an HIV protein known to activate glial cells  into rodents’  spinal cord.

mouse

The vagus nerve is the immune conduit to the brain; mice studies suggest it plays a key role in producing ‘sickness behavior’

They found that the glial cells  reared up and starting producing pro-inflammatory cytokines to take care of the intruder. Not surprisingly,  the rodents looked and acted sick – the cytokines were doing their job to keep the animal down and isolated – but  no trace of those cytokines could be found  in their bloodstream.  Only if the animal’s spinal cord was sampled near where the ‘infection’ was  it possible to find any evidence of increased cytokine levels.

If VanElzakker is right, then blood  cytokine levels in ME/CFS are a function of where your vagus nerve is infected. If it’s infected in your  abdominal area, you might find cytokines in the blood, but it might be hard to find them in your spinal fluid. If your vagus nerve is infected near your brainstem you might find cytokines  in the spinal fluid, but you probably won’t find them in your blood.

Wherever the infection is there’s a good chance you may not find cytokines in the blood  at all.  This isn’t a  completely surprising fact or even restricted to the vagus nerve infections; cytokines in  mice with lung infections, for instance, showed up only when the lungs themselves were sampled.

Next Steps

VanElzakker suggests animal studies to better understand infections of the vagus nerve and to ultimately to build a chronic fatigue syndrome rodent model would be helpful.  Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be able to detect viral lesions in central nervous system tissues. It is not yet known if  PET scans can detect the activation of a different type of glial cells; the satellite glia that are in vagus nerve ganglia and paraganglia, but special PET scans might be able to be used to assess microglial activation.

Cadaver studies of people who had ME/CFS definitely aren’t his first choice, but they could find activated glia, inflammation and viral infections of the vagus nerve and associated structures.  Finally,  novel protocols should be developed to assess the vagus nerve and brainstem functioning in ME/CFS.  The severely ill should be given a prominent place in future studies.

 

prescription drugs

If VanElzakker is correct different treatments could be in store for people with ME/CFS

A New Treatment Approach

“Glial cell inhibitors could become standard treatment for CFS (caused by CNS vagus nerve infection)” VanElzakker

Glial Cell Inhibitors

If VE’s theory is correct then glial cell inhibitors to stop the immune activation, antivirals to attack the pathogens, vagus nerve stimulation and surgical alteration of the vagus nerve might be possible treatments sometime in the future.

Glial cell inhibitors have a good safety profile, have been helpful at curbing neuropathic pain and are not used much in chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia.

ibudilast

If VanElzakker is right then Ibudilast, a drug in clinical trials now for another disorder, is a possibility.

Ibudilast (AV411/MN166), a drug used mostly in Japan, knocks down glial cell activation by inhibiting the production of a proflammatory cytokine called macrophage-migration-inhibitory factor (MIF)  and TNF-a.  Reduced levels of TNF-a could provide a bonus by increasing the breakdown of  a excitatory neurotransmitter called glutamate that may be helping to keep your central nervous system on edge.

Ibudilast is also  known to have neuroprotective and vasodilative effects and is usually used to treat asthma and stroke. It’s ability to suppress glial cell activation has made it useful in the treatment of neuropathic pain, and it’s currently undergoing clinical trials to treat neuropathic pain in Australia.  Ibudilast can also prevent viral activation of the microglia.

The NIH is funding Ibudilast trials in the US to see if it’s effective against drug addiction. If successful the drug could be available here for off-label use in ME/CFS  in three or four years.

Other general microglial inhibitors exist (minocyline, pentoxyfilline, propentfylline) but have undesirable side effects.

Antivirals

Stopping glial cell activation may be easier than getting at the viruses themselves.  Herpesviruses living in the sensory ganglia may be protected from antiviral drugs and antibodies.  (One new herpesvirus drug may be coming on the market soon, however.) Alternately, viruses other than the herpesviruses could be infecting the vagus nerve.

Behavioral Therapy

VanElzakker also notes that while behavioral therapies are not curative and may only apply to a subset of patients, they can help moderate symptoms and improve quality of life in some.

Conclusion

The VNIT may be able to explain more puzzling aspects of chronic fatigue syndrome than any other.  Next up we talk with Dr. VanElzakker about how he got interested in ME/CFS and what his theory may mean for this disorder.

 

Big Antiviral Trial Could Usher in New Treatment Era for Fibromyalgia

 A New Approach to Fibromyalgia

Infections are a common trigger for fibromyalgia (FM), and fibromyalgia patients are experience many ‘sickness behavior’ symptoms, but we haven’t usually associated FM with viruses or immune system problems.

woman questioning

So it’s going to be Fibromyalgia that gets the really big antiviral trial ….

That’s been changing  recently. A immune biomarker has been proposed. Small fiber neuropathy - possibly caused by immune dysregulation – has been found. Dr. Dantini has been treating FM with antivirals for years.  The immune system’s starting to get some respect in FM.

Now, in a surprising twist, it’s going to be fibromyalgia rather than chronic fatigue syndrome, that’s getting the big, placebo controlled, double-blinded multi-center antiviral trial.

Last year we heard that Dr. William Pridgen in  Alabama was getting his ducks in a row for a major antiviral trial. Four weeks ago in an email exchange he confirmed that the money – $3.3 million dollars – all gathered from ‘angel investors’ is in  hand, and the four-month 143 patient trial began  in early October.

Pridgen’s Innovative Med Concepts biotech startup is producing the study.

A Different Path

The pathways researchers and doctors take to get to disorders like FM or chronic fatigue syndrome are nothing but diverse, and it’s worth taking a look at how Dr. Pridgen, a surgeon, came to fibromyalgia. (Dr. Julia Newton’s pathway to ME/CFS was through elderly people experiencing dizziness and, to her surprise, a great deal of fatigue.) Dr. Pridgen’s pathway to fibromyalgia was through the gut.

Pridgen saw a pattern emerge in his  treatment of thousands of patients with chronic gastrointestinal issues that intrigued him. A patient would get better, but then experience a stressful event that would send him/her back into the soup.  They would get better, but during the next relapse they would stay sick longer and their recovery period would be shorter. Eventually they would be sick all the time.

virus

Shorter and shorter relapses over time in his patients lead Pridgen to conclude that a virus must be involved.

The problem, he thought, had to be some sort of pathogen that was steadily increasing with every recurrence. Giving his patients antivirals helped, but problems remained. Then he found that adding an anti-inflammatory (which also had anti-viral properties) reduced their fatigue, gastrointestinal complaints, depression and anxiety markedly and improved their energy.

An observational study indicating that the combination drug approach had a 90% ‘efficacy rate’ led Pridgen to start a company, enlist investors and create the large treatment trial.

Pridgen’s theory fits glove and hand with several other fibromyalgia/chronic fatigue syndrome theories. As with Van Elzakkers’ vagus nerve infection theory for ME/CFS, Pridgen’s theory begins with a nerve loving virus that takes up residence – for life – in nerves in the sensory ganglia found across the body.

Instead of HHV6 or EBV Pridgen believes herpes simplex viruses, are the key in FM/ME/CFS. Other than a 1993 theory proposing herpes simplex virus was at play in ME/CFS, interest has been scanty. HSV-1’s ability to affect many of the genes and gene pathways suspected of playing a role in nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, depression, chronic fatigue syndrome and autism, however, lead one researcher to propose it could play a role in all of them.

HSV-1 has been found in the esophagus, stomach and duodenum of the gastrointestinal system. In fact, HSV-1 was proposed to  cause ‘recurrent functional gastrointestinal disorders’ such as IBS, as far back as 1996.

Pridgen’s patent application indicates that he believes that stressors and  peptides and hormones released by the sympathetic nervous system and HPA axis  set the stage for herpes simplex-1 reactivation. Pridgen proposes that repeated HSV reactivation can  kill the sensory nerve cells ( small fiber neuropathy?) and destroy part of the nerve ganglion.  (Stress induced HSV-1 reactivation has been documented in laboratory animal studies.)

Once  these neurons and ganglia are damaged, Pridgen believes they send out signals that ultimately muck up the pain processing centers in the central nervous system. The over-generation of neurotransmitters such as glutamate, Substance P, serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) involved in this process then causes central sensitization.

Antiviral Plus

Pridgen proposes to stop the viral reactivation and the central sensitization with antivirals; an approach that’s been tried before in chronic fatigue syndrome, but not in the way Pridgen’s doing it.

connections

Are two ‘antivirals’ better than one? We’ll find out sometime next year.

One of Pridgen’s patent applications suggests that one of his unique insights has been to combine valacyclovir (valtrex) with an anti-inflammatory, Celecoxib (Celebrex) that has antiviral properties.  Other combinations are being tested and Pridgen stated  they have not released the make-up of IMC formulation used in the trial. It’s not clear, then, what drugs at what doses were used in the study or which will prove most effective. 

Celexcoxib (Celebrex) is a non-steroidal antinflammatory (NSAID) COX-2 inhibitor usually used  in the treatment of osteoarthritisrheumatoid arthritisacute pain, painful menstruation and menstrual symptoms. It down regulates the activity of inflammation producing  cells.

Pridgen proposes that the  two drugs hit the virus at different stages of its life-cycle. Pummeling the virus with that one-two punch, he believes, will finally stop the virus from reactivating.

Pridgen and Duffy are looking for herpes simplex virus, but other herpes viruses could be affected by this treatment. We won’t know if they are until further studies are done.

Inflammation Gone Awry

Pridgen and his partner, molecular virologist, Carol Duffy will also attempt to develop a diagnostic test for fibromyalgia using cytokine arrays they believe will document high levels of  pro-inflammatory cytokines and low levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

Like VanElzakker, Pridgen believes the body is over-reacting to the virus.

“It’s basically exaggerating its reaction to the virus. Any little stress reactivates the virus, and, rather than the body saying, ‘Oh, this is just a virus I’ve been living with this since I was five,’ the body keeps saying, ‘Oh, my God,’ and throws on all this inflammation, and that gives these people this pain.”

“There is a theory that all pain, one way or another, is inflammation,” Duffy says. “It’s inflammation gone awry.”

Not just Fibromyalgia

Pridgen and Duffy have their eyes on more than Fibromyalgia.  Pridgen’s provisional patent proposes this treatment will work for chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pain, chronic headache, chronic neck pain, chronic back pain, chronic depression, chronic clinical anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), brain fog, cognitive dysfunction and chronic interstitial cystitis.

Celebrex – The Antiviral?

We don’t hear anything about Celecoxib as a virus fighter in ME/CFS, but some evidence suggests it could be efficacious against herpes simplex virus. The ability of COX-2 inhibitors to decrease prostaglandin production is believed to push the immune system towards a Th1 (antiviral) response and away from the Th2 response often found in ME/CFS.

stop sign

Pridgen believes Celexicob’s antiviral properties, in concert with Valtrex, will knock down the herpes viruses causing FM and ME/CFS

Celebrex was shown to reduce stress induced herpes virus reactivation in the nervous systems of mice.  Another study found that reactivation of HSV-1 in mice was associated with upregulation of COX-2 gene expression in their nerve ganglia.  HHV-6 can also induce COX-2 expression.  Both COX-1 and COX-2 are needed for viral replication.

(One mother found that VIOXX (now off the market) reduced her daughters IL-6 levels and eliminated the ‘panic attacks’  she’d experienced following a central nervous system infection.)

(Aspirin and flavanoids, vitamin E and fish oils also inhibit COX-2. The efficacy some ME/CFS patients experience from using omega-3 fatty acids could be due to antiviral effects.)

Tissue Biopsies

Along with treating the virus, Pridgen and his partner, molecular virologist Carol Duffy, will be using PCR to test for the virus, not in the blood, but in gut tissue samples.

One of the most intriguing aspects of the Pridgen-Duffy study is the search for HSV-1, not in the blood, but in the tissues. We know the Chronic Fatigue Initiative’s Pathogen study  failed to find evidence of viral infection in the blood. Now, Pridgen and Duffy are testing gut samples for herpes virus simplex in their study.

First PCR will be used to search for herpesviruses in both the control and FM gut samples. Then antibodies will be used to determine if an active infection is present.  In subsequent studies, electron microscopy will look for the herpesviruses particles themselves.

In preliminary studies 18/19 fibromyalgia patients with gut issues contained herpes simplex virus DNA in their gut tissues. No other herpesviruses were found. Immunoblot testing indicated that an active infection was present in eight of nine positive biopises.

Dr. Pridgen reported in an email they are still trying to determine  the optimum doses and cautioned everyone to wait until the results of the phase three trial are done before starting this treatment.  He also stated he feels  they are ‘very close’ to helping many people with this condition.  The results of trial will be released mid-year, 2014. 

Conclusion

breakthrough arrow

A successful trial could usher in a new era of treatment for fibromyalgia and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome

Pridgen and Duffy’s big multi-center antiviral trial in Fibromyalgia is nothing if not exciting in its scope and approach. Pridgen’s ability to come up with over $3,000,000 in startup funding suggests he and Duffy have got some solid data backing their trial up. .

If they results are positive, Pridgen and Duffy could usher in an entirely new way of treating both fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Novel Approach to Herpesvirus Infections Could Reap Dividends for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

Liang Y, Vogel JL, Arbuckle JH, Rai G, Jadhav A, Simeonov A, Maloney DJ, Kristie TM. Targeting the JMJD2 Histone Demethylases to Epigenetically Control Herpesvirus Infection and Reactivation from Latency. Sci Transl Med. 2013 Jan 9. PMID: 23303604.

Common Infections..Sometimes Uncommon Effects

An uncommon common virus

Unlike most viruses once you’re infected with herpesviruses you’re usually infected for life.

Herpesviruses are fundamentally different from most other viruses we come into contact with.  Most viruses  get completely eliminated from our systems  but herpesviruses have found a way to stick around – usually effectively bottled up by our immune system – for a lifetime ride in our cells. Very common in humans, we’ve all been exposed to and almost all of us carry a  latent or inactive herpesvirus infection.

Usually contracted in childhood most herpesvirus infections produce nothing more troubling than a childhood cold but they have a dark side.   A Epstein Barr virus infection that causes a mild cold in childhood often produces  infectious mononucleosis in adolescents and increase one’s risk of later coming down with multiple sclerosis and ME/CFS.  A mild herpes simplex infection during childhood can turn into an  painful case of shingles when we’re older.

Herpesvirus infections may be ubiquitous and usually mild but they  can cause encephalitis, blindness, horrific neurological problems and inflammation if they hit the right person at the wrong time. Not surprisingly, people with impaired immune systems such transplant patients are at high risk of herpesvirus reactivation with sometimes deadly consequences.

Key Viruses in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

herpesvirus

A significant percentage of people may have reactivated herpesvirus infection.

Herpesviruses may play a key role in ME/CFS as well. How many people with chronic fatigue syndrome have a reactivated form of the virus is still unclear but some doctors believe the percentage is substantial. Many people begin their experience with chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) with a herpesvirus infection in the form of infectious mononucleosis.

Dr. Lerner and Dr. Glaser believe an unusual form of Epstein-Barr  virus is wreaking havoc in many patients. Their model suggests proteins and enzymes produced by a  partial reactivation of the virus are sending  the immune system into a tizzy and causing fatigue and other symptoms. Because the current slate of  herpesvirus antivirals attack the virus in the later stages of it’s development they’re in effect missing the action in ME/CFS.  These drugs work to some degree.  As they slowly lower viral load, the cells harboring the viruses die off over time.

Help Needed 

“there remains a clear need to develop new antivirals”

The problem is that in this model  the road to recovery takes time and lots of it; often a year or more of taking expensive antivirals. Dr. Lerner’s  been looking for a treatment that will hit the virus just as it’s starting to replicate and he’s  not alone. Even when the full virus is present, the present slate of  antivirals still sometimes  arrive too late to prevent blindness, neurological problems, birth defects and inflammation. The current herpesvirus antivirals come too late to the scene to

  1.  block the production of mutant viruses that can give rise to resistant strains of virus
  2.  block the expression of early viral enzymes that effect  and can produce cancer in cells
  3.  block the product of viral proteins that can trigger a damaging immune response (Lerner/Glaser’s theory of ME/CFS)

A Possible Breakthrough

A new approach to treating herpesvirus infections could reap dividend for other viral infections as well. An entirely different way of treating herpesvirus infections could reap dividend for other viral infections as well.

A new approach to attacking hard to treat herpesvirus infections could reap dividend for other viral infections as well.

“Depletion of the JMJD2 members or inhibition of their activity with a new drug results in repression of expression of viral immediate early genes and abrogation of infection. This inhibitor also represses the reactivation of HSV from the latent state in sensory neurons”

That may be changing. Researchers working at National Chemical Genomic Center (NCGC) have a developed  a ‘probe’ that stops herpesviruses from replicating by  pouncing  on the early enzymes they use to build a new virus.   (Ironically the virus uses our genetic machinery to get our bodies to produce the enzymes to build another virus). These researchers were able to design this probe after they figured out what genes these herpesviruses activate early in their life cycle.  This ‘epigenetic’ approach – stopping a virus by targeting the genes it needs to replicate – may very well herald a new era in antiviral therapy.

It’s  death by small cuts. By continually stopping the virus from replicating the herpesvirus will eventually  die when the cell they’re  living in dies. The good news for ME/CFS patients is that this probe could also whack the very enzymes Lerner and Glaser believe are causing ME/CFS. That could  mean no more long, expensive and sometimes dangerous treatment regimens.

The Implications for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

This study focused on two herpesvirus infections (cytomegalovirus (HCMV), herpes simplex) sometimes found in ME/CFS. In Dr. Peterson’s presentation in Paris on the successful treatment of HCMV infections in ME/CFS, he reported that a small subset of ME/CFS patients have an active herpes simplex infection, as did Dr. Montoya at the FDA Drug Development Workshop.

Epstein-Barr Virus and Human Herpesvirus 6?

 Continued elucidation of the mechanisms and components involved in epigenetic regulation of viral pathogens will lead to additional targets for antiviral development

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) are the pathogens most commonly associated with ME/CFS, however. I was unable to determine if the  enzyme targeted by this probe is found in these viruses. The fact that the  herpesvirus family undergoes a process called chromatic assembly and modulation in which the enzyme plays a role  suggests the probe might be effective in other herpesviruses.The fact that the probe worked in both alpha and beta herpesviruses (EBYis a gamma herpesvirus) suggests it may have widespread application but we’ll have to see if it applies to these viruses as well.

Dr. Martin Lerner, a specialist in treating herpesvirus infections in chronic fatigue syndrome has high hope for this approach.

My own research suggest immediate early gene products initiate CFS.  I think this work has great promise in effectively inhibiting many herpesviruses. Dr. Martin Lerner

Even if it doesn’t this discovery provides a new approach to drug treatment  that could be duplicated in other herpesviruses. Indeed these researchers are already looking for other epigenetic targets, one of which is found in Epstein-Barr virus.

This ‘probe’ has still  long way to get to the marketplace. It’s demonstrated its effectiveness in cultured cells and now needs to be assessed in animal models and  humans.

outside the box

This same epigenetic approaches that are effective in cancer are effective with viruses as well.

A New Paradigm for Antiviral Drug Development

There is intensive focus on the development of inhibitors of epigenetic components for the treatment of cancers and other diseases. The study presented here demonstrates that epigenetic inhibitors can also function as antiviral therapeutic agents.

The success of a drug employing a epigenetic approach to infection was big news with the study appearing in the premier scientific journal Science and the authors urging other researchers to pour resources into developing more epigenetic tools to fight infection.

Your Brain on Viruses: Study Finds Even Common Viruses Cause Cognitive Declines

The ‘Manhattan Project’

The Northern Manhattan Study is an immense project that’s taking a deep look at health in Northern Manhattan, New York . The project consists of  analyzing basic health characteristics of several  thousand people over time and it’s spinning out studies at a dizzying rate.  The project is not on chronic fatigue syndrome, but because it’s  looking at factors that have shown up in ME/CFS it may shed  some  light on what’s happening there.  In fact it may shed a lot of light.

Manhattan

The ‘Manhattan Project’ is examining health issues in a wide swath of the population. Several findings may have relevance to ME/CFS/FM

For instance, each of the studies below looked at a factor that’s been found (in at least some studies) in ME/CFS and  each of the findings seemed to make sense what we know of ME/CFS.

Increased IL-6 levels were associated with cognitive declines in one study, and increased  soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1) levels were associated with increased  mortality in another.  Increased levels of daytime sleepiness in the elderly were associated with increased risk of stroke, heart attack and vascular events in another.   Metabolic syndrome was associated with cognitive declines in another. Eating a Mediterranean diet was associated with  reduced ‘white matter hyperintensity volume’ a marker of small blood vessel breakage in the brain and reduced vascular events such as stroke.

Infectious Burden

Neurology. 2013 Mar 26;80(13):1209-15. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182896e79.Infectious burden and cognitive function: The Northern Manhattan Study. Katan MMoon YPPaik MCSacco RLWright CBElkind MS.

The most applicable study to ME/CFS, however, is clearly the latest one which determined if infectious disease burden was associated with cognitive declines.  In this study the researchers tested  blood from a broad swath of the population in New York  for antibodies to common bacteria and viruses (three of them herpes viruses) and gave the participants  cognitive tests.  Then they created an index of infectious burden (IB) and determined if more infections meant more problems with cognition…and found they did; the more active infections present, the  worse the cognitive impairment.

Infections

This study suggested that having more infections, active or latent, are associated with reduced cognition.

No ME/CFS studies have attempted to associate pathogen load with cognitive declines but given the increased  rate of infections Dr. Peterson and other immunologically oriented ME/CFS  doctors have found and the documented cognitive impairment in ME/CFS, the finding made sense. Cognitive impairment is  associated with brain issues but the researchers didn’t zero in on the brain; instead they focused on cardiovascular problems which interfered with blood flows to the brain.

It turns out that studies have linked common infectious agents to inflammation, coronary artery disease and stroke and a past ‘Manhattan project’ study found  that high infectious burdens  were associated with an increased risk of stroke and increased carotid plaque buildup.

Many viral pathogens in the herpesviridae family, characterized by latent or persistent infection, were implicated in increased stroke risk.

It appears that chronic infections often play havoc with cardiovascular functioning. Infectious organisms can impact cardiovascular functioning in various ways. They can directly invade the vascular walls. C. pneumoniae and H. pylori DNA was found in aetherosclerotic lesions in 26%  and 37% of cardiac bypass patients in one study.  With regards to pathogens commonly found in ME/CFS, high rates of active HHV6 infection  found in Italian cardiac patients who did not have aetherosclerosis suggested the virus may play a role in heart patients who have idiopathic heart disease.

Cardiovascular Issues

At the 2008 HHV6 Symposium in Baltimore, a German researcher, Dr. Lassner reported that heart biopsies he’d done in German heart patients commonly revealed parvovirus B-19, HHV-6, enterovirus and/or Epstein-Barr Virus infections.  He noted that HHV-6 infection of the blood vessel walls results in the production pro-inflammatory cytokines which can constrict the blood vessels, impair capillary production and reduce heart blood flows. HHV6’s ability to trigger blood vessel wall constriction is intriguing given studies suggesting it may play a key role in ME/CFS.

Blood vessels

Pathogens can affect the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular problems appear to be rife in ME/CFS.

Lassner, interestingly, found antivirals (IVIG-parvovirus, interferon-enterovirus) to be effective in virus infected heart patients, but reported much the same treatment response  pattern found in many ME/CFS patients; improvement while on antivirals followed by relapse when off them.

Infections can also turn on the macrophages which help create the dangerous plaques, they can confuse the immune system into attacking parts of the body and they can help an inflammatory state that is damaging, etc.

These observations, along with the results of this current study lend support to the notion that past or chronic exposure to common infections, perhaps by exacerbating inflammation, may be an important etiologic factor of atherosclerosis.

Simply the presence of active herpesvirus or other infections  can contribute to an inflammatory mileu that can be detrimental.  Katan reported that an inflammatory state could lead to aetherosclerosis, ‘subclinical stroke’ and dementia. Subclinical strokes (ie transient ischemic attacks from which patients recover) primarily effect executive functioning, one of the cognitive processes known to be impaired in ME/CFS.  Changes in mood and  the ability to organize and take on multiple tasks could be a sign of a ‘subclinical stroke‘.  Other symptoms can include feelings of numbness or weakness, double vision, dizziness/vertigo, confusion, inability to speak, loss of balance or coordination.

Cardiovascular issues have been found in ME/CFS and more and more attention is being given to this area. Cardiovascular control is impaired,  reduced cardiac vagal tone is associated with cognitive declines, impaired blood pressure variability,  reduced cerebral blood flows, reductions in stroke volume and cardiac output (all this in the past year and a half)  provide ample evidence of impaired cardiovascular functioning in this disorder.  Interestingly autonomic nervous system issues similar to those found in ME/CFS were correlated with cognitive declines in fibromyalgia.

All in all the finding of decreased cognitive functioning with increased infectious burden in the  Northern Manhattan Study findings may not be surprising for many people with ME/CFS. At the most recent HHV6 Conference in Paris Dr. Peterson reported on several ME/CFS patients who’s cognitive abilities rebounded remarkably following Vistide infusions for herpesvirus infections and Dr. Lerner has reported similar results in his herpesvirus infected patients.

Conclusions

The latest Manhattan project study should be helpful in highlighting not only the cognitive declines but the cardiovascular risks that are associated with common or  chronic latent or active infections. Since active infections are part and parcel of ME/CFS, this study’s important association of decreased cognitive function with increased infectious burden suggests that measuring both those factors in ME/CFS should be routine, and may offer objective measurements of treatment efficacy.

Report From Paris: Peterson Reports Antiviral (Vistide) Effective in Treating Herpesvirus Infected Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Patients

PetersonPhoto right

“These results show objective endpoints, subset selection, and recovery. There were complete responders and partial responders among severely ill CFS patients with HHV6 or CMV. These are encouraging results for this subset and further well-designed trials should be pursued to confirm them.” Dr. Dan Peterson

At the HHV6 Conference in Paris, France today Dr. Peterson reported on the results of a retrospective study following 65 severely ill chronic fatigue syndrome patients given a course of Vistide from 2005-2012 for HHV6 and/or HCMV infections.  Despite the interest in pathogens in ME/CFS, antiviral studies are rare and this is the first one reported for this drug.

Virus from vistide presentation


Dr. Peterson has three decades of experience treating immunologically challenged ME/CFS patients.

Vistide (Cidofovir) gets a lot less press than other antivirals and immunomodulators (Ampligen, Rituximab, Valcyte,  Valtrex) used in this disorder  probably because the drug requires a  complex infusion protocol,  frequent blood tests because of the rare but real possibility of  serious kidney side effects and is expensive  (although it can be covered by insurance).

This combination – infusions, frequent blood tests and expense – requires close physician follow-up. With Dr. Peterson’s specialized focus on patients with dysfunctional natural killer cells, however, he may be most consistent about testing for herpesviruses, which are known to be active in ME/CFS patients.

After three decades of focusing on immunologically challenged ME/CFS patients, Peterson may be more experienced at pathogen detection and treatment than any other practitioner in the field, and so it’s not surprising to find the first Vistide study coming from his office.  In an interview, a former patient of his said, ‘he leaves no stones unturned'; when he finds something he goes after it ‘aggressively’.

In his presentation he stated  almost 30% of  his patients test positive for  active HHV-6 or human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) (PCR, rapid culture, antigenemia), and a whopping 50% test positive for active Epstein-Barr virus (EBNA) infection.

Serious Drug For A Serious Illness

Vistide (Cidofovir) is  FDA approved for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in patients with AIDS. (Cytomegalovirus is a member of the herpesvirus family.) and it’s been used off-label to treat  human papillomavirus, BHK virus, herpes simplex virus, vaccinia virus infections. The Black Box warning on Vistide speaks for itself

 ‘Cases of acute renal failure resulting in dialysis and/or contributing to death have occurred with  few as one or two doses of Vistide. The “recommended dose, rate, frequency of Vistide injections must not be exceeded.”

The Study

A positive response was denoted by a negative pathogen test, improved fatigue and cognitive functioning determined by an interview with Dr. Peterson and  the patient’s self reports after the trial.

Response

  • Full Responders - Patients were deemed to be full responders if they were able to completely return to work or to work-related activities
  • Partial Responders – demonstrated significant improvement of symptoms but were unable to return to work or work related activities.
  • Non-Responders – Did not demonstrate any measurable improvement post-treatment

Results

Seventy percent patients improved

Seventy percent of ME/CFS patients with HHV6 and/or HCMV infections improved significantly on Vistide

Dr. Peterson reported that seventy percent of patients were full  (able to return to work) or partial (significant increase in functionality) responders; a very high rate of success in a illness characterized by a poor response to treatments.  Only thirty percent of Vistide recipients did not have a significantly positive response to the drug. No serious side effects were seen; ironically the minor side effects seen were attributed to a drug, Probocenid, used to ensure Vistide was safe.

It’s not clear what percentage of ME/CFS patients will test positive for HHV6 or cytomegalovirus in other practices but this type of response suggests the drug may be  being under-used. With the FDA Stakeholder’s meeting  coming up in three weeks and the Chronic Fatigue Initiative’s pathogen discovery study results due to be published later this year, Dr. Peterson’s presentation is timely. (Unfortunately, Dr. Peterson was not invited to present at the FDA Stakeholder’s Meeting.)

Dr. Peterson called for placebo-controlled, double-blinded multi-center studies that address Vistide’s efficacy, examine its effects on the immune system and study the mechanisms of increase in VO2 max scores in ME/CFS.

Sample Cases

Dr. Peterson reported on several cases, all of whom were men – something Dr. Peterson has said he likes to do to break up the notion that only women get this disorder.

  • A 27 year old college graduate  unable to work because of  constant flu-like symptoms, weakness and marked cognitive decline (math!) presented with low NK functioning, low VO2 max and HHV6 and cytomegalovirus infection. He was able to return to work after 24 weeks of bi-weekly infusions. His VO2 max on the exercise test went up went up 23%,  his NK cells a remarkable 400% and he tested negative for both viruses at the end of treatment. He had had ME/CFS for three years.
  • A 54 year-old former high school teacher unable to work due to extreme fatigue, flu-like symptoms and cognitive problems severe enough to keep him from being able to grade his students papers presented with active HHV6 and cytomegalovirus infections and low NK cell functioning and VO2 max. He was able to return to work after 24 weeks of bi-weekly infusions. His VO2 max increased 47%, his NK function test went up 20% and he tested negative for both viruses. He had had ME/CFS for five years.
  • The third patient had classic, acute onset ME/CFS which progressed to seizures. Both serum and cerebral spinal fluid tested positive for HHV6. At the end of the Cifodovir trial the  viral load in his cerebral spinal fluid dropped from 3670 copies/ml to undetectable levels. Serum HHV6 was dramatically reduced (47,000 copies/ml to 3,000 copies/ml). Still symptomatic and experiencing cognitive problems, he was nonetheless able to return to work.

Conclusions

The retrospective study indicated Vistide (cifodovir) can have dramatic effects on functional capacity in HHV6 and/or HCMV infected ME/CFS patients.

Increasing VO2 max appeared to be critical to increasing functionality as the partial responders did not increase their VO2 max while on Cifodovir. At the FDA Advisory Meeting for Ampligen Dr. Bateman noted that VO2 max test results probably were, given the exertional problems in ME/CFS, the most difficult to ‘move’ test result in this disorder.

VO2 max levels in Dr. Peterson’s patients prior to Vistide administration were exceedingly low; they appeared to in the ‘very low’ range even for people for 65 years of age and older. Vistide moved those test results about 20% on average; leaving them still, it appeared, below normal but sufficient enough for a significant increase in functionality.

A Vistide Example

Vistide_CFSThe VO2 max tests suggested most patients had not returned to full health and Dr. Peterson has said he knows of few complete recoveries. I interviewed a former patient of Dr. Peterson’s several years ago. Faced with the loss of his career and the ability to care financially for his family Vistide turned out to be a godsend.

Cut down by acute onset ME/CFS, his VO2 max score topped out at an unbelievably low 15 (which qualified him for heart disease) and he was a ‘2’ out of 10 on his own energy scale (had trouble sitting up to eat).  Within a month on Vistide he was at a ‘4’; the next month he was a ‘5’ and sleeping soundly for the first time since he’d gotten sick. The next month he was a ‘7’ and his VO2 max tests had doubled to 28; still far below the 44 expected at his age, but an amazing increase, never the less.  Three months later he was at ‘90%’, back at work and able to do everything except exercise.

CMX001 – The Future Vistide? 

Dr. Peterson didn’t report on CMX001 in Paris, but sitting in the background of all this is a analogue of Vistide called CMX001 which appears to be a safer and more effective,  if not yet available, version of it. A  2012 review named CMX001 as one the ‘ten hot topics’ in antiviral research.

Chimerix Pharmaceuticals modified Vistide so that it can easily be taken up into the  tissues. That means no need for infusions, no worries about kidney problem and according to Chimerix, dramatically increased effectiveness.

CMX001 has been in development for  some time but just this March the FDA awarded the drug ‘fast track’ status for the prevention of cytomegalovirus infection.  Phase II trials are finished  and Phase III trials will get underway this year.

Given Dr. Peterson’s success with Vistide, FDA approval of CMX001 could be very good news for ME/CFS patients with HHV6, HCMV and/or possibly EBV infections.

Wrap Up

In a retrospective study Vistide proved to be  effective  in treating severely ill ME/CFS patients with HHV6 and HCMV infections. Dr. Peterson called for double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies to further study Vistide’s efficacy and mechanism of effect.  The CFI’s pathogen discovery studies due out this year should shed light on what percentage of ME/CFS patients could benefit from Vistide.

A Vistide analogue under development called CMX001 which does not require infusions and does not effect the kidneys could be boon for ME/CFS patients with herpesvirus infections if it is approved by the FDA. CMX001 was given fast-track status by the FDA earlier this year.

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